12c

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Subquery with OR

I’ve written a couple of notes in the past about the problems of optimising queries with predicates of the form “or exists {subquery}”. A recent question on the Oracle Developer Community forum brought to my attention an improvement in this area in (very precisely) 12.2, as well as giving me a cute example of how the first cut of a new feature doesn’t always cover every detail, and creating a nice example of how the new technology enhances the old technology.

We start with some data and a simple query running under 12.2.0.1:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Case and Aggregate bug

The following description of a bug appeared on the Oracle Developer Community forum a little while ago – on an upgrade from 12c to 19c a query starting producing the wrong results on a simple call to the average() function. In fact it turned out to be a bug introduced in 12.2.0.1.

The owner of the thread posted a couple of zip files to build a test case – but I had to do a couple of edits, and change the nls_numeric_characters to ‘,.’ in order to get past a formatting error on a call to the to_timestamp() function. I’ve stripped the example to a minimum, and translated column name from German (which was presumably the source of the nls_numeric_characters issue) to make it easier to demonstrate and play with the bug.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Massive Deletes

One of the recurrent questions on the Oracle Developer Commuity forum is:

What’s the best way to delete millions of rows from a table?

There are an enormous number of relevant details that you need to know before you can give the “right” answer to this question, e.g.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Fetch First Update

A question about mixing the (relatively new) “fetch first” syntax with “select for update” appeared a few days ago on the Oracle Developer Forum. The requirement was for a query something like:


select
        *
from
        t1
order by
        n1
fetch
        first 10 rows only
for     update
;

The problem with this query is that it results in Oracle raising error ORA-02014: cannot select FOR UPDATE from view with DISTINCT, GROUP BY, etc. The error doesn’t seem to be particularly relevant, of course, until you remember that “fetch first” creates an inline view using the analytic row_number() under the covers.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

WITH Subquery

Here’s another anomaly that appears when you mix and match Oracle features. In this case it’s “With” subqueries (common table expressions / CTEs) and Active Dataguard (ADG) Standby databases. The problem appeared on the Oracle-l listserver and luckily for the OP another member of the list had seen it before and could point to a relevant MOS document id which explained the issue and supplied a workaround.

The OP had their standby database opened read-only for reporting and found the following oddity in the extended SQL trace file for one of their reports:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Group by Elimination

Here’s a bug that was highlighted a couple of days ago on the Oracle Developer Community forum; it may be particularly worth thinking about if if you haven’t yet got up to Oracle 12c as it appeared in an optimizer feature that appeared in 12.2 (and hasn’t been completely fixed) even in the latest release of 19c (currently 19.6).

Oracle introduce “aggregate group by elimination” in 12.2, protected by the hidden parameter “_optimizer_aggr_groupby_elim”. The notes on MOS about the feature tell us that Oracle can eliminate a group by operation from a query block if a unique key from every table in the query block appears in the group by clause. Unfortunately there were a couple of gaps in the implementation in 12.2 that can produce wrong results. Here’s some code to model the problem.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Trace Files

A recent blog note by Martin Berger about reading trace files in 12.2 poped up in my twitter timeline yesterday and reminded me of a script I wrote a while ago to create a simple view I could query to read the tracefile generated by the current session while the session was still connected. You either have to create the view and a public synonym through the SYS schema, or you have to use the SYS schema to grant select privileges on several dynamic performance views to the user to allow the user to create the view in the user’s schema. For my scratch database I tend to create the view in the SYS schema.

Script to be run by SYS:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

_cursor_obsolete_threshold

At the recent Trivadis Performance Days in Zurich, Chris Antognini answered a question that had been bugging me for some time. Why would Oracle want to set the default value of _cursor_obsolete_threshold to a value like 8192 in 12.2 ?

In 11.2.0.3 the parameter was introduced with the default value 100; then in 11.2.0.4, continuing into 12.1, the default value increased to 1,024 – what possible reason could anyone have for thinking that 8192 was a good idea ?

The answer is PDBs – specifically the much larger number of PDBs a single CBD can (theoretically) support in 12.2.

In fact a few comments, and the following specific explanation, are available on MoS in Doc ID 2431353.1 “High Version Counts For SQL Statements (>1024) Post Upgrade To 12.2 and Above Causing Database Slow Performance”:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Quiz Night

Upgrades cause surprises – here’s a pair of results from a model that I constructed more than 15 years ago, and ran today on 12.2, then modified and ran again, then ran on 11.2.0.4, then on 12.1.0.2. It’s very simple, I just create a table, gather stats, then update every row.

connor_mc_d's picture

Statistics on Load

One of the talks I gave recently on the Groundbreaker Yatra tour was on the changes that arrive with the optimizer when you move to 12c and above. We talked about changes to histograms, all of the adaptive features etc, but also, one of the simplest but coolest optimizer improvements when it comes to loading data. When you perform a direct-path insert into an empty table, or a create-table-as-select (CTAS) operation, there is no need to perform an additional DBMS_STATS call to gather statistics at the conclusion of the load. The load process itself handles that for you. Here’s a simple example of that in action

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