12c Release 1

martin.bach's picture

RAC 12c enhancements: adding an additional SCAN-part 3

Travel time can be writing time and while sitting in the departure lounge waiting for my flight I use the opportunity to add part 3 of the series. In the previous two parts you could read how to add a second SCAN and the necessary infrastructure to the cluster. Now it is time to create the standby database. It is assumed that a RAC One Node database has already been created on the primary cluster and is in archivelog mode.

Static Registration with the Listeners

The first step is to statically register the databases with their respective listeners. The example below is for the primary database first and standby next, it is equally applicable to the standby. The registration is needed during switchover operations when the broker restarts databases as needed. Without static registration you cannot connect to the database remotely while it is shut down.

martin.bach's picture

RAC 12c enhancements: adding an additional SCAN-part 3

Travel time can be writing time and while sitting in the departure lounge waiting for my flight I use the opportunity to add part 3 of the series. In the previous two parts you could read how to add a second SCAN and the necessary infrastructure to the cluster. Now it is time to create the standby database. It is assumed that a RAC One Node database has already been created on the primary cluster and is in archivelog mode.

Static Registration with the Listeners

The first step is to statically register the databases with their respective listeners. The example below is for the primary database first and standby next, it is equally applicable to the standby. The registration is needed during switchover operations when the broker restarts databases as needed. Without static registration you cannot connect to the database remotely while it is shut down.

martin.bach's picture

RAC 12c enhancements: adding an additional SCAN-part 2

In the first part of this article you could read how to add an additional network resource, additional VIPs and SCAN to an 12.1.0.1.2 cluster. In this part I hope to show you the next steps such as adding the SCAN listeners and other resources.

New SCAN listener

With the second SCAN added it is time to add the next set of SCAN listeners. This is really simple, and here is the code to add them:

[oracle@ron12cprinode1 ~]# srvctl add scan_listener -netnum 2 -listener dgscanlsnr

After starting the SCAN listeners on network 2, I can see they are indeed working correctly:

martin.bach's picture

RAC 12c enhancements: adding an additional SCAN-part 2

In the first part of this article you could read how to add an additional network resource, additional VIPs and SCAN to an 12.1.0.1.2 cluster. In this part I hope to show you the next steps such as adding the SCAN listeners and other resources.

New SCAN listener

With the second SCAN added it is time to add the next set of SCAN listeners. This is really simple, and here is the code to add them:

[oracle@ron12cprinode1 ~]# srvctl add scan_listener -netnum 2 -listener dgscanlsnr

After starting the SCAN listeners on network 2, I can see they are indeed working correctly:

martin.bach's picture

RAC 12c enhancements: adding an additional SCAN-part 1

Based on customer request Oracle has added the functionality to add a second SCAN, completely independent of the SCAN defined/created during the cluster creation. Why would you want to use this feature? A few reasons that spring to mind are:

  • Consolidation: customers insist on using a different network
  • Separate network for Data Guard traffic

To demonstrate the concept I am going to show you in this blog post how I

  1. Add a new network resource
  2. Create new VIPs
  3. Add a new SCAN
  4. Add a new SCAN listener

It actually sounds more complex than it is, but I have a feeling I need to split this article in multiple parts as it’s far too long.

The lab setup

martin.bach's picture

RAC 12c enhancements: adding an additional SCAN-part 1

Based on customer request Oracle has added the functionality to add a second SCAN, completely independent of the SCAN defined/created during the cluster creation. Why would you want to use this feature? A few reasons that spring to mind are:

  • Consolidation: customers insist on using a different network
  • Separate network for Data Guard traffic

To demonstrate the concept I am going to show you in this blog post how I

  1. Add a new network resource
  2. Create new VIPs
  3. Add a new SCAN
  4. Add a new SCAN listener

It actually sounds more complex than it is, but I have a feeling I need to split this article in multiple parts as it’s far too long.

The lab setup

martin.bach's picture

Duplicate from the standby instead from the primary in 12c

This post is related to 12c and an active database duplication for a standby I did in my lab environment. I’d say although I first encountered it on 12c there is a chance you run into a similar situation with earlier releases too.

I would normally use ASM for all my databases to make my life easier but this time I had to be mindful of the available memory on the laptop-which at 8 GB-is not plenty. So I went with file system setup instead. After the initial preparations I was ready to launch the one-liner on the standby database:

RMAN> duplicate target database for standby from active database;

This worked away happily for a few moments only to come to an abrupt halt with the below error message. I have started the duplication process on the standby.

martin.bach's picture

Duplicate from the standby instead from the primary in 12c

This post is related to 12c and an active database duplication for a standby I did in my lab environment. I’d say although I first encountered it on 12c there is a chance you run into a similar situation with earlier releases too.

I would normally use ASM for all my databases to make my life easier but this time I had to be mindful of the available memory on the laptop-which at 8 GB-is not plenty. So I went with file system setup instead. After the initial preparations I was ready to launch the one-liner on the standby database:

RMAN> duplicate target database for standby from active database;

This worked away happily for a few moments only to come to an abrupt halt with the below error message. I have started the duplication process on the standby.

martin.bach's picture

Recovering a standby over the network in 12c

Another one of the cool but underrated features in 12c is the possibility to recover a physical standby over the network with one line in RMAN.

Why do you need to perform this activity? Assume someone really clever created a segment “nologging” and the database was not in force logging mode. This operation cannot be replicated by redo apply on the standby, and you are bound to have a problem. Or, in my case, I had the standby shut down in my lab environment (intentionally) and created a few PDBs on my primary. For some reason I lost an archived redo log. This would of course not happen in a production environment, but my lab VM is limited when it comes to space and I may have moved my backup to a USB disk that I didn’t bring along.

martin.bach's picture

Recovering a standby over the network in 12c

Another one of the cool but underrated features in 12c is the possibility to recover a physical standby over the network with one line in RMAN.

Why do you need to perform this activity? Assume someone really clever created a segment “nologging” and the database was not in force logging mode. This operation cannot be replicated by redo apply on the standby, and you are bound to have a problem. Or, in my case, I had the standby shut down in my lab environment (intentionally) and created a few PDBs on my primary. For some reason I lost an archived redo log. This would of course not happen in a production environment, but my lab VM is limited when it comes to space and I may have moved my backup to a USB disk that I didn’t bring along.

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