12c

oraclebase's picture

Oracle Database File System (DBFS) in Oracle 12c : WebDav Support?

On a yoga course a teacher said to the group, “Don’t try to remember everything I say. Some things will come back to haunt you later.”

So I was reviewing a couple of chapters of Marcelle Kratochvil‘s multimedia book and she mentioned DBFS. That jogged a memory of the DBFS demo stand at OOW12, where the guy told me that 12c will (probably) have WebDAV support for DBFS.

DBFS is a neat feature, but it’s a little frustrating if you are using any OS other than Linux because you are forced to use a client utility with limited functionality, rather than accessing it like a regular file system as you can on Linux using the FUSE project. If this WebDAV functionality does get released in 12c it will make it accessible from pretty much any OS or browser.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Pluggable 12c

For anyone looking for information on 12c, there are several posts about OpenWorld at the dbi Services blog (see links at right). In particular there’s a summary post about the “pluggable database” describing how you could plug a database into a “container” database, clone it inside the container database, then unplug it and put it somewhere else.

When I heard about the feature, it crossed my mind that there were two “obvious” targets for this technology that Oracle had in mind – in no particular order:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Indexing 12c

Another little detail that Hermann Baer mentioned in his presentation yesterday was the ability to create multiple indexes with the same column definition – something which currently gets you Oracle error “ORA-01408: such column list already indexed.” 

No details, and there’s always the “safe harbour” slide of course – the one which says seomthing about the presentation being only an indication of current thinking and nothing is guaranteed to appear.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Partitioning 12c

Most useful presentation of OOW so far, from Hermann Baer of Oracle on improvements in partitioning features in 12c – and there are lots of useful ones, including:

Online move of a partition – so easy to compress a partition when it has reached its final “read-only” state

multiple partition maintenance in one operation – e.g. merge 3 monthly partitions into one quarterly partition, or split one partition into 24 (think about “how do I partition a non-partitioned table”, and 12c has just made it easier and quicker – exchange it into an empty partitioned table, then do one massive split).

partial indexing – define which partitions of a partitioned table should be included in the indexes you create on the table – and the optimizer also knows that different partitions need different plans (an enhancement of “table expansion”.

oraclebase's picture

Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c Release 2 Installation…

I did an EM Cloud Control 12cR2 installation at work yesterday. The database repository was 11.2.0.3 on HP-UX and the middle tier was installed on RHEL 5.8. The installation was pretty much the same as the 12cR1 version. Over the next few days I’ll be testing out some of the features to decide if we can move across to it permanently.

Today I did two run throughs of single server installations on Oracle Linux 5.8 and 6.3. There are a couple of minor differences, but nothing to worry about. You can see what I did here:

The installations are a little small, so they are not too fast, but it’s good enough to test things out.

Cheers

Tim…

oraclebase's picture

What happens when 12c Cloud Control runs out of disk space?

Question: What happens when 12c Cloud Control runs out of disk space?

Answer: It doesn’t work very well. :)

I have a 12c Cloud Control installation on an Oracle Linux 6.1 VM and I was pushing an agent to both nodes of an 11.2.0.3 RAC, also on OL6.1 VMs. The agent installation seemed to go fine and the agent upload to CC was fine, but when I tried to discover the database on the nodes it went a bit loopy. After a little messing about I noticed my disk was maxed out on the 12c CC server. Bummer!

So I turned off the VM, added another virtual disk, turned it back on and added the new disk to the existing volume. Bob’s your uncle!

oraclebase's picture

Oracle Database on Oracle Linux 6.1…

I mentioned the day before Open World I put a Virtual RAC on Oracle Linux 6.1 article live. Although the procedure was complete, some of the screen shots were from an old article as I didn’t have time to redo them before my flight. :) I’ve just run through the procedure again and taken new screen shots. As a result, I’ve allowed the article to display on the front page of the website, which is why you will see it listed as a new article there.

This kinda rounds out the whole Oracle on 6.1 stuff as there has been a single instance installation guide out for ages and more recently the Cloud Control installation, which references it.

Remember, it’s still not certified yet, but it’s coming.

Cheers

Tim…




Niall Litchfield's picture

First Impressions of EM12C

One of the major announcements at Oracle Open World last week was the launch of Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c, though I’m going to refer to the product as em for the rest of this blog. EM is a product that I both love and which completely infuriates me from time to time. Its worth understanding [...]

oraclebase's picture

Cloud Control 12c R1 Installation on Oracle Linux 5.7 and 6.1…

While I was at Open World I tried a few times to get hold of the new Cloud Control software, but the hotel network wasn’t up to the job, so I had to wait until I got home.

The installation is pretty simple compared to previous versions of Grid Control and it installs fine on both Oracle Linux 5.x and 6.x. As always it’s a little greedy on the memory front, with the recommendation for a small installation being 4G for the Cloud Control and 2G for the repository database. That’s not including the OS requirement. On the subject of the repository database, you can use a number of 10g and 11g versions, but anything before 11.2.0.2 requires additional patches, so I stayed with 11.2.0.3.

You can see what I did here.

Cheers

Tim…




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