bugs

Jonathan Lewis's picture

FBI Delete

A recent post on Oracle-l complained about an oddity when deleting through a function-based index.

I have a function based index but the CBO is not using it. The DML that I expect to have a plan with index range scan is doing a FTS. Its a simple DML that deletes 1000 rows at a time in a loop and is based on the column on which the FBI is created.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Bugs

Last week I published some code that demonstrated how a fast refresh of an aggregate materialized view could fail because of the internal use of the sys_op_map_nonnull() function. In some ways it was an easy problem to explain because all you had to do was trace the call to refresh and see what was going on. Today’s bug is completely different – it’s virtually impossible to see the connection between the failure and its cause. Here (as a cut-n-paste) is an example of what happens when the bug appears:

execute dbms_stats.gather_schema_stats(user)
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-01760: illegal argument for function
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 13336
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 13682
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 13760
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 13719
ORA-06512: at line 1

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Surprises

I’ve given examples in the past of how you can be suprised by Oracle when a mechanism that has “always worked” in the past suddenly just doesn’t work because some unexpected internal coding mechanism hits a boundary condition. One example I gave of this was rebuilding indexes online – where a limitation on the key size of index organized tables made it impossible to do an online rebuild of an index on a heap table because of an ORA-01450 (maximum key length) error that was raised against the (index-organized) journal table that  Oracle creates internally to support the rebuild.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Debugging

One of my recent assignments involved a company that had run into some performance problems after upgrading from 10.2.0.3 to 11.2.0.2. We had spent half an hour on the phone discussing the system before I had arrived, and I’d made a couple of suggestions that had solved most of their problems before I got on site – but they still wanted me to come in and give them some specific ideas about why the critical part of the solution had helped.

The most critical piece of advice I had given them (after listening very carefully to their description of the system) was to get rid of ALL the histograms they had on their system, and then watch very carefully for any signs that they might need to re-introduce a handful of histograms over the next few weeks.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Unique Fail

As in – how come a unique (or primary key) index is predicted to return more than one row using a unique scan, for example (running on 10.2.0.3 – but the same type of thing happens on newer versions):

Jonathan Lewis's picture

ACS

You’ve probably heard about adaptive cursor sharing, and possibly you’ve wondered why you haven’t seen it happening very often on your production systems (assuming you’re running a modern version of Oracle). Here’s a little bug/fix that may explain the non-appearance.

MOS Doc ID 9532657.8 Adaptive cursor sharing ignores SELECTs which are not fully fetched.

This bug is confirmed in 11.2.0.1, and fixed in 11.2.0.3. The problem is that the ACS code doesn’t process the statistical information from the cursor unless the cursor reaches “end of fetch” – i.e. if you don’t select all the data in your query, Oracle doesn’t consider the statistics of that execution when deciding whether or not to re-optimise a statement.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

First_rows hash

Just like my posting on an index hash, this posting is about a problem as well as being about a hash join. The article has its roots in a question posted on the OTN database forum, where a user has shown us the following execution plan:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Missing Filter

I see that Christian Antognini posted a note about an interesting little defect in Enterprise Manager a little while ago - it doesn’t always know how to interpret execution plans. The problem appears in Christians’ example when a filter subquery predicate is applied during an index range scan – it’s a topic I wrote about a few months ago with the title “filter bug” because the plan shows (or, rather, fails to show) a “missing” filter operation, which has been subsumed into the predicate section of the thing that would otherwise have been the first child of the filter operation – the rule of recursive descent through the plan breaks, and the ordering that OEM gives for the operations goes wrong.

Greg Rahn's picture

Pitfalls of Using Parallel Execution with SQL Developer

[This post was originally published on 2012/02/29 and was hidden shortly thereafter. I’m un-hiding it as of 2012/05/30 with some minor edits.]

Many Oracle Database users like tools with GUI interfaces because they add features and functionality that are not easily available from the command line interfaces like SQL*Plus. One of the more popular tools from my experiences is Oracle SQL Developer in part because it’s a free tool from Oracle. Given SQL Developer’s current design (as of version 3.1.07.42), some issues frequently show up when using it with Oracle Databases with Parallel Execution. SQL Developer also contains a bug that exacerbates this issue as well.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Upgrades again

I’ve just spent a couple of days in Switzerland presenting seminar material to an IT company based in Delemont (about 50 minutes drive from Basle), and during the course I picked up a number of new stories about interesting things that have gone wrong at client sites. Here’s one that might be of particular interest to people thinking of upgrading from 10g to 11g – even if you don’t hit the bug described in the blog, the fact that the new feature has been implemented may leave you wondering where all your machine resources are going during the overnight run.

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