cloud

Franck Pachot's picture

ADWC new OCI interface

A few things have changed about the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud service recently. And I’ve found the communication not so clear, so here is a short post about what I had to do to start the service again. The service has always been on the OCI data centers but was managed with the classic management interface. It has been recently migrated to the new interface:
CaptureADWCnew
Note that ADWC here is the name I’ve given for my service. It seems that the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service is now referred by the ADW acronym.

Bertrand Drouvot's picture

demystifying and wrapping the oracle cloud APIs with Python

As an oracle DBA you might have to deal with REST API, especially when working with the cloud. The purpose of this post is to demystify the REST API usage from a DBA point of view. Let’s take an example and write a Python wrapper to automate the Instance creation in the Oracle Database Cloud Service.

The instance creation can be done manually using the Web Interface that way:

Franck Pachot's picture

Which Bitnami service to choose in the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure?

In the Oracle Cloud PaaS you have a marketplace where you can choose your service. Some are packaged from Bitnami and available on multiple OS. My first idea is that in PaaS you do not care about the OS. But Oracle Cloud has this very nice feature where you still have full access to the OS, as root, even in PaaS. Then, you choose the Linux distribution of your preference. Except if performance is different. They run on different Linux kernels. Is Oracle Linux Unbreakable Kernel more efficient?

We need to compare with relevant and reliable measures. And for that I’ve created a Postgres service and used Kevin Closson SLOB method, as I’m a lucky beta tester for pgio. I’ll post later about the creation of the Postgres service in the Oracle Cloud.

Franck Pachot's picture

ADWC – connect from your premises

In the previous post about the Autonomous Data Warehouse Service, I’ve run queries though the Machine Learning Notebooks. But you obviously want to connect to it from your premises, with SQL*Net.

CaptureADWCconnect001Of course the connection, going through the public internet, must be secured. If you already use a managed service like the Oracle Exadata Express Cloud Service, you already know how to do: download a .zip containing the connection string and the wallet and certificate for SQL*Net encryption.

Franck Pachot's picture

SQL Developer Web on the Oracle Cloud

You like SQL Developer because it is easy to install (just unzip a jar) and has a lot of features? Me too. It can be even easier if it is provided as a web application: no installation, and no java to take all my laptop RAM…
When I say no installation, you will see that you have some little things to setup here in DBaaS. That will probably be done for you in the managed services (PDBaaS) such as ‘Express’ and ‘Autonomous’ ones.

CaptureSDW010

Franck Pachot's picture

ADWC – the hidden gem: Zepplin Notebook

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In the previous blog posts I explained how to create, and stop/start the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud service. And I didn’t show yet how to connect to it. It is easy, from sqlplus or SQL Developer, or SQLcl.

But there’s something more exciting to run some SQL queries: the Oracle Machine Learning Notebooks based on Apache Zepplin. At first, I didn’t realize why the administration menu entry to create users in the ADWC service was named ‘Manage Oracle ML Users’, and didn’t realize that the ‘Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud’ header was replaced by ‘Machine Learning’.

Franck Pachot's picture

ADWC – a Docker container to start/stop Oracle Cloud services

In the previous post, I’ve explained how to start and stop the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud service from PSM (PaaS Service Manager). There’s a setup phase, and a run phase starting with service-start and ending with service-stop. And the setup is specific to an Oracle Cloud account, storing information in the local user home. You may want to run different setups, and even provide an easy way to start/stop an Oracle Cloud service without knowing the user, password and tenant name.

A Docker container is perfect to isolate this.

Franck Pachot's picture

ADWC: start/stop with PSM Command Line Interface

In the previous post, I explained how to create an Autonomous Data Warehouse with PSM (PaaS Service Manager Command Line Interface). The most common operation you want to do with it is starting and stopping the service. This is the best way to save credits for hourly billed services. And PSM is the easiest: run from everywhere (it is Python 3) and no need to provide credentials each time. In the previous post, I explained how to setup PSM for the ADWC service.

Unfortunately, for starting and stopping the instance you may realize that:

Franck Pachot's picture

ADWC: Creation of Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud service

You want to try the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service? That’s easy. Here is a Step-by-Step.

dbakevlar's picture

GDPR Solutions in the Day of Automation

There’s something for having job security and many of the solutions that I see offered for RDBMS challenges offer just that. With compliance with EU’s GDPR, (General Data Protection Regulations) just around the corner, (mark you calendar, May 25, 2018) you’d think we’d all be scrambling for a simpler solution to discovering and addressing all that GDPR data.

Quick refresher for those of you going, “What is GDPR?”

Data security is a known focus of GDPR when you talk to folks, but it’s much more than just security.  It’s about extended rights of the individual in the EU. There’s four areas as a DBA, you need to really concern yourself with:

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