cloud

Franck Pachot's picture

SQL Developer Web on the Oracle Cloud

By Franck Pachot

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You like SQL Developer because it is easy to install (just unzip a jar) and has a lot of features? Me too. It can be even easier if it is provided as a web application: no installation, and no java to take all my laptop RAM…
When I say no installation, you will see that you have some little things to setup here in DBaaS. That will probably be done for you in the managed services (PDBaaS) such as ‘Express’ and ‘Autonomous’ ones.

CaptureSDW010

Franck Pachot's picture

ADWC – the hidden gem: Zepplin Notebook

By Franck Pachot

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IMG_5339
In the previous blog posts I explained how to create, and stop/start the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud service. And I didn’t show yet how to connect to it. It is easy, from sqlplus or SQL Developer, or SQLcl.

But there’s something more exciting to run some SQL queries: the Oracle Machine Learning Notebooks based on Apache Zepplin. At first, I didn’t realize why the administration menu entry to create users in the ADWC service was named ‘Manage Oracle ML Users’, and didn’t realize that the ‘Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud’ header was replaced by ‘Machine Learning’.

Franck Pachot's picture

ADWC – a Docker container to start/stop Oracle Cloud services

By Franck Pachot

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In the previous post, I’ve explained how to start and stop the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud service from PSM (PaaS Service Manager). There’s a setup phase, and a run phase starting with service-start and ending with service-stop. And the setup is specific to an Oracle Cloud account, storing information in the local user home. You may want to run different setups, and even provide an easy way to start/stop an Oracle Cloud service without knowing the user, password and tenant name.

A Docker container is perfect to isolate this.

Franck Pachot's picture

ADWC: start/stop with PSM Command Line Interface

By Franck Pachot

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In the previous post, I explained how to create an Autonomous Data Warehouse with PSM (PaaS Service Manager Command Line Interface). The most common operation you want to do with it is starting and stopping the service. This is the best way to save credits for hourly billed services. And PSM is the easiest: run from everywhere (it is Python 3) and no need to provide credentials each time. In the previous post, I explained how to setup PSM for the ADWC service.

Unfortunately, for starting and stopping the instance you may realize that:

Franck Pachot's picture

ADWC: Creation of Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud service

You want to try the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service? That’s easy. Here is a Step-by-Step.

dbakevlar's picture

GDPR Solutions in the Day of Automation

There’s something for having job security and many of the solutions that I see offered for RDBMS challenges offer just that. With compliance with EU’s GDPR, (General Data Protection Regulations) just around the corner, (mark you calendar, May 25, 2018) you’d think we’d all be scrambling for a simpler solution to discovering and addressing all that GDPR data.

Quick refresher for those of you going, “What is GDPR?”

Data security is a known focus of GDPR when you talk to folks, but it’s much more than just security.  It’s about extended rights of the individual in the EU. There’s four areas as a DBA, you need to really concern yourself with:

Franck Pachot's picture

A free persistent Google Cloud service with Oracle XE

In a previous post I’ve listed several free online services which run an Oracle XE so that you can test your SQL easily. You may want use Oracle XE further, with full access to the database and its host, and still from a web browser. You probably have a Google account. Then you also have a Virtual Machine on the Google Cloud (0.5 vCPU / 1.70 GB RAM boostable to 1 vCPU / 3.75 GB) and 5 GB of persistent storage (as long as you used it in the 120 previous days). Just try this Google Cloud Shell: https://console.cloud.google.com/cloudshell.
In this post, I explain how to install Oracle XE there.

Franck Pachot's picture

Spectre and Meltdown on Oracle Public Cloud UEK – LIO

In the last post I published the strange results I had when testing physical I/O with the latest Spectre and Meltdown patches. There is the logical I/O with SLOB cached reads.

Franck Pachot's picture

Spectre/Meltdown on Oracle Public Cloud UEK – PIO

The Spectre and Meltdown is now in the latest Oracle UEK kernel, after updating it with ‘yum update':

[opc@PTI ~]$ rpm -q --changelog kernel-uek
| awk '/CVE-2017-5715|CVE-2017-5753|CVE-2017-5754/{print $NF}' | sort | uniq -c
43 {CVE-2017-5715}
16 {CVE-2017-5753}
71 {CVE-2017-5754}

As I did on the previous post on AWS, I’ve run quick tests on the Oracle Public Cloud.

Physical reads

I’ve run some SLOB I/O reads with the patches, as well sit KPTI disabled, and with KPTI, IBRS and IBPB disabled.

And I was quite surprised by the result:

dbakevlar's picture

Content- My Year in Review, 2017

So where did 2017 go?!?!?  I really, really would like to know…  Needless to say, it’s time to do a year in review already and I actually have time to do it this year!

DBAKevlar Blog

I wrote over 100 blog posts this year between DBAKevlar, Delphix and partner sites, but I’ve enjoyed sharing with the different communities.  There’s significant changes going on in the IT world regarding the future of the Database Administrator.

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