cloud

dbakevlar's picture

Swingbench with the AWS Trial

Swingbench is a one of the best choices for easy loads on a database.

Franck Pachot's picture

Google Cloud Platform instances and Oracle Database

When it comes to choose a cloud instance to run Oracle Database, you want to be able to run your workload on the minimum CPU cores. This is why in a previous post I measured how many logical reads per seconds can be achieved with a SLOB workload, on AWS which is often the first considered, and will probably do it on Azure in the future. I did the same on the Oracle Cloud which is the only one where Oracle make it easy to run an license the Oracle Database.

dbakevlar's picture

Manually Adding Sales History, (SH) Schema to 11.2.0.4

Most people know I like to do things the hard way… </p />
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Franck Pachot's picture

Oracle 12cR2, RAC, Cloud, ACFS, PDB thin clones and asmadmin

In the Oracle Public Cloud, fast provisioning gets all its meaning when creating a RAC database service: in one hour you can get an operational highly available multitenant database. You can even create it in Data Guard for Disaster Recovery. Now, Oracle is pushing ACFS to store the datafiles rather than direct ASM. Especially in multitenant because a great feature is thin cloning: CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE AS SNAPSHOT COPY. However, I encountered an error when I tried it for the first time.

TDE keystore

SQL> create pluggable database pdb2 from pdb1 snapshot copy;
create pluggable database pdb2 from pdb1 snapshot copy
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-28357: password required to open the wallet

Oh yes, in the cloud all tablespaces are encrypted. In 12.2 we can put the keystore password in the command:

Franck Pachot's picture

Oracle 12cR2: changes for login.sql

If you use a login.sql script to set the SQL*Plus environment from your current working directory, you will see that it will not run anymore in 12.2. This is a security feature, and a good occasion to explain how sqlplus finds the scritps to run, on Linux.

For my test I have login.sql, LOGIN.SQL and script.sql in the following directories

$ tree /tmp/mytest/
/tmp/mytest/
├── a
│   ├── login.sql
│   ├── LOGIN.SQL
│   └── script.sqlL
├── b
│   ├── login.sql
│   ├── LOGIN.SQL
│   └── script.sql
├── login.sql
├── LOGIN.SQL
└── script.sql

I’m going to the parent directory
cd /tmp/mytest

The scripts display their name:

+ head login.sql LOGIN.SQL script.sql
==> login.sql LOGIN.SQL script.sql <==
prompt Hello from /tmp/mytest/script.sql

dbakevlar's picture

Why the DBA is Necessary to the Cloud- Part I

There are a lot of people and companies starting to push the same old myth regarding the death of the database administrator role in companies.  On the Oracle side, it started with release Oracle 7 and now is proposed with the introduction of cloud.  Hopefully my post will help ease the mind of those out there with concerns.

dbakevlar's picture

Clone…err, Cloud Wars

No, this isn’t a title for a future Star Wars movie, but our own future, foreseen by me, (as well as many others) from experience, research and discussions everyday.

fritshoogland's picture

Performing in the cloud – network latency

To me, ‘cloud computing’ is renting a compute resource to perform a task. In order to use that compute resource, you need to instruct it to do something, which is typically done via the network. If the task the compute resource needs to fulfil is being an application server or being a client or both in the case of an application server that uses an Oracle database, the network latency between the client of the database and the database server is a critical property.

dbakevlar's picture

The Delphix Trial on AWS- Get It While Its HOT!

I don’t want to alarm you, but there’s a new Delphix trial on AWS!  It uses your own AWS account and with a simple set up, allows you to deploy a trial Delphix environment.  Yes, you hear me right-  just with a couple steps, you could have your own setup to work with Delphix!

Jonathan Lewis's picture

DBaaS Performance

I don’t know how I missed it but Randolf Geist has been doing writing a series of posts on the performance of Oracle’s DBaaS offering, using a series of long-running tests to capture not only raw performance figures but also an indication of consistency. You can find all of these tests with a search URL on his blog, but I’ve also created a little index here to make it easier for me to access them in order.

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