cloud

connor_mc_d's picture

How do I get my trace files on a db-as-a-service

Yeah, sure it would be cool to crank up some big time powered VM’s in the cloud and let rip, but the reality is – if you’re starting out on a cloud exploration, you probably want to (initially at least) just dip your toes in the water and start with something small.  For example, if I wanted to play with 12c Release 2, I can just sign up for an Exadata Express service so I can explore the new features without breaking the bank.

But whatever the need, accessing a database as a service as opposed to a server, there’s often that fear of “handing over the reins”, that is, that I’ll not be able to do the things I want to do, especially when it comes to OS level access.  And for a developer or DBA, perhaps a thing that might raise alarm bells is: “How will I access my trace files ?”

dbakevlar's picture

Working on an AWS Host as a DBA

We, DBAs, have a tendency to over think everything.  I don’t know if the trait to over think is just found in DBAs or if we see it in other technical positions, too.

marco's picture

eProseed Oracle Open World 2016 debrief – Oracle Database & Oracle Management Cloud

For people interested, here the slide desks used internally to debrief my colleagues regarding Oracle…

Johnjayking's picture

Clearing Clouds: Unraveling IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS

Cloud, Cloud, and More Cloud!

Cloud is upon us! Unless you’ve been living under a rock you must be aware that our industry is headed to the cloud; some of us are already there!

Many cloud services are available and more are coming every day. How can you make sense of the many “#ff0000;">?aaS” acronyms? In this article I’ll explain the differences between Cloud Service Models (IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS) and Cloud Deployment Options (public, private, and hybrid).

Cloud Service Models

Many, many acronyms come along with the cloud; here are three that are common:

  • IaaS  Infrastructure as a Service
  • PaaS  Platform as a Service
  • SaaS  Software as a Service

IaaS

Infrastructure as a Service means that the cloud provider provides: Hardware, Operations. and maybe core operating systems.

Johnjayking's picture

Oracle 12.2 DBaaS Availability!

At Oracle Open World 2016 Larry Ellison introduced Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2) and shared that it would be available first to Oracle Cloud customers.

Immediately after Open World 12.2 became available to people who subscribed to the Oracle Exadata Express Cloud; those of us on DBaaS needed to wait for a little while longer.

In the second week of November, Oracle released Oracle Database 12c Release 2 (12.2) to DBaaS (DataBase as a Service) customers. Here’s how it looks when creating an instance:

oracledbaas12cr2

karlarao's picture

Azure and Oracle Cloud – My First Time

Below talks about my experience trying out Azure and Oracle cloud for the very first time (and at the same time).


So last night I tried for the very 1st time the Azure and Oracle Cloud. Here, I just like to share my experience. BTW I am a big fan of DigitalOcean because of its user friendly interface, very fast to setup (end to end 2 minutes w/ few button clicks), and fantastic community and HOWTOs (https://www.digitalocean.com/community/). If I have to choose a cloud dev environment provider I would still use DigitalOcean.

Now, being a newbie on both these platforms. I’m looking for a similar experience as DigitalOcean.

The cloud experience comparison is broken down to 3 categories:

marco's picture

Oracle 12.2.0.1 DBaaS database available

Just created my first Extreme Performance 12.2.0.1 database in the cloud.oracle.com. So just after a…

marco's picture

Scoop – First glance of the new Oracle Live SQL?

When I was at OOW this year I saw the new (?) Oracle Live SQL…

iggy_fernandez's picture

What keeps database administrators awake at night and the search for the promised land

What keeps you and me awake at night? When I was a consultant for a Fortune 500 company in Southern California, we were getting beaten up to prove that databases were being backed up correctly and that disaster recovery would work. The truth of the matter was that we didn’t even have an accurate list of all the databases and databases would go down for days without anybody noticing which means that they were not even being monitored correctly. In fact, the yet unsolved NoCOUG murder mystery...(read more)

Johnjayking's picture

SQL Developer and Oracle DBaaS

Connecting to Oracle DBaaS from SQL Developer

Introduction

So, you have access to an Oracle DBaaS instance. How do you connect so that you can run use SQL Developer’s navigator or execute SQL and PL/SQL scripts? An earlier post showed how easy it is to create an Oracle DBaaS instance. This article will show you how to connect to DBaaS from SQL Developer.

When a DBaaS instance is created it is necessary to supply a private/public key pair to enable more-secure access via SSH (Secure Shell). By adjusting the DBaaS properties, you can also expose the CDB and PDB using the IP address without the protection of SSH (probably not a good idea for production use).

SSH Public Key

To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.
Syndicate content