Database

Franck Pachot's picture

Oracle archivelog deletion policy

Here are my posts on the dbi-services blog about archivelog deletion policy.

The deletion policy on a dataguard configuration should be:
CONFIGURE ARCHIVELOG DELETION POLICY TO APPLIED ON ALL STANDBY;

for the site where you don’t backup. It can be the standby or the primary.

and:
CONFIGURE ARCHIVELOG DELETION POLICY TO APPLIED ON ALL STANDBY BACKED UP 1 TIMES TO DISK;

for the site where you do the backups. It can be the primary or the standby.

Some related posts:

jeremy.schneider's picture

This Week in PostgreSQL – May 31

Since last October I’ve been periodically writing up summaries of interesting content I see on the internet related to PostgreSQL (generally blog posts). My original motivation was just to learn more about PostgreSQL – but I’ve started sharing them with a few colleagues and received positive feedback.  Thought I’d try posting one of these digests here on the Ardent blog – who knows, maybe a few old readers will find it interesting? Here’s the update that I put together last week – let me know what you think!


Hello from California!

Part of my team is here in Palo Alto and I’m visiting for a few days this week. You know… for all the remote work I’ve done over the years, I still really value this in-person, face-to-face time. These little trips from Seattle to other locations where my teammates physically sit are important to me.

jeremy.schneider's picture

This Week in PostgreSQL – May 31

Since last October I’ve been periodically writing up summaries of interesting content I see on the internet related to PostgreSQL (generally blog posts). My original motivation was just to learn more about PostgreSQL – but I’ve started sharing them with a few colleagues and received positive feedback.  Thought I’d try posting one of these digests here on the Ardent blog – who knows, maybe a few old readers will find it interesting? Here’s the update that I put together last week – let me know what you think!


Hello from California!

Part of my team is here in Palo Alto and I’m visiting for a few days this week. You know… for all the remote work I’ve done over the years, I still really value this in-person, face-to-face time. These little trips from Seattle to other locations where my teammates physically sit are important to me.

jeremy.schneider's picture

This Week in PostgreSQL – May 31

Since last October I’ve been periodically writing up summaries of interesting content I see on the internet related to PostgreSQL (generally blog posts). My original motivation was just to learn more about PostgreSQL – but I’ve started sharing them with a few colleagues and received positive feedback.  Thought I’d try posting one of these digests here on the Ardent blog – who knows, maybe a few old readers will find it interesting? Here’s the update that I put together last week – let me know what you think!


Hello from California!

Part of my team is here in Palo Alto and I’m visiting for a few days this week. You know… for all the remote work I’ve done over the years, I still really value this in-person, face-to-face time. These little trips from Seattle to other locations where my teammates physically sit are important to me.

dbakevlar's picture

Be the Change You Want to See In the (Tech) World

The only thing that stays the same is change….

As the time flies by and the world turns, I often am jarred back to reality when I discover how the little things we do can have a larger impact on the world around us.

Flying back from Interop ITX and StarEast conferences last week, I was reminded of this.  While reading the latest copy of Wired , I came across a story on D-Tech High School.  This is the school that resides on the Oracle headquarters campus, in its own building(s). The story was interviewing different students to discuss how they were making an impact on the technical world and how STEM schools, like D-Tech were changing the future.  What struck me, was that the lead in picture and student interview was with a young woman I’d worked with two years earlier as part of the Oracle Education Foundation.

dbakevlar's picture

Broadening Your Audience

I spent this week speaking at two conferences that may not be familiar to my usual crowd:
Techwell StarEast Testing Conference in Orlando, FL
Interop ITX Data Conference in Las Vegas, NV

pete.sharman's picture

Duplicating a Database on ODA

Introduction

Every so often, we get a request to duplicate a database for one of our customers using an Oracle Database Appliance (ODA). The process for doing that is relatively straightforward, but there are a couple of nuances along the way so I thought I’d write it up as a blog post in case it’s of use to others. Obviously, I have obfuscated any customer-specific information to protect their identity.

Configuration

The first nuance is to understand what database is being used as the source for the clone. Generally, a request for cloning will be something like this:

“We are creating a new environment which needs a new database to be set up. Please copy P1_SRV_T and restore as P1_SRV_F”.

pete.sharman's picture

Duplicating a Database on ODA

Introduction

Every so often, we get a request to duplicate a database for one of our customers using an Oracle Database Appliance (ODA). The process for doing that is relatively straightforward, but there are a couple of nuances along the way so I thought I’d write it up as a blog post in case it’s of use to others. Obviously, I have obfuscated any customer-specific information to protect their identity.

Configuration

The first nuance is to understand what database is being used as the source for the clone. Generally, a request for cloning will be something like this:

“We are creating a new environment which needs a new database to be set up. Please copy P1_SRV_T and restore as P1_SRV_F”.

connor_mc_d's picture

Oracle Database 18c

Yup…it’s arrived!

New name obviously, because we’ve jumped to our new naming model to align with the calendar year as opposed to version number.  You might be thinking “So what?” but it’s a significant change in the way we getting software to customer.  Mike Dietrich blogged about this at length here so I won’t repeat what has been said, but in TL;DR form:

More frequent releases, with smaller amounts of change per release

In this way, the approach lets us focus more of solidifying existing features, and being able to quickly respond to bugs that arise.

So 18c is more an incremental release on 12.2 (in fact, internally it was referred to as “12.2.0.2” for most of it’s build cycle) focussed on stability and hardening of existing features.

pete.sharman's picture

Post GI / RDBMS Installation Configuration Steps

Introduction

This is the third article in a series of blog posts on building a test environment to closely match a Production environment so we could then upgrade the test environment from Oracle Database 12.1 to Oracle Database 12.2. In the first post, I covered performing a silent installation of the grid infrastructure software. In the second post, I followed that by performing a similar silent installation of the RDBMS software. In this post, I’ll be covering the rest of the configuration work for this environment.

To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.
Syndicate content