DBA

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Compressed LOB–my table got bigger?

We had an interesting question on AskTOM the other day about LOB compression. Someone was very concerned that after applying compression to the LOBS in the column of their table, the table actually got larger! Cue much confusion and panic, but after a little exploration, the explanation was pretty simple.

By default, when you create a LOB column in a table, the default storage definition is ENABLE STORAGE IN ROW. As per the documentation:

If you enable storage in row, then the LOB value is stored in the row (inline) if its length is less than approximately 4000 bytes minus system control information

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LOBs vs Data – when compression occurs

Just a quick tip for SECUREFILE lobs.

You may be familiar with basic compression on data in tables. It is a dictionary attribute of the table, which is then taken into account when you perform:

  • a SQL Loader direct load, or
  • an INSERT with the APPEND hint, or
  • a bulk bind INSERT in PLSQL using the APPEND_VALUE hint.

Whichever of the above you perform does not really matter – the key thing is that when you set the COMPRESS attribute on a table, this only applies on operations subsequent to the moment at which you altered the table. It does not compress the existing data. Hence when you alter a table to add the attribute, it is instantaneous.

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Partial Indexes–Take Care With Truncate

Partial indexes are a very cool feature that came along with Oracle 12c. The capability at partition level to control index existence allows for a couple of obvious use cases:

1) You index the data in recent partitions only, because small amounts of data are aggressively searched by applications and/or users, but not the older data because the queries for older data are either less frequent or are more analytical in nature.

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Correcting datatypes with minimal downtime

Just a quick post here by request of an attendee of the September Office Hours. I had a demo converting the data type of a primary key without losing data and with minimal impact to the availability of the database using DBMS_REDEFINITION.  You can see that video here

but here is the script used to run that demo. 

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Another little 12c improvement

You’ve got a huge table right? Massive! Immense! And then something bad happens. You get asked to remove one of the columns from that table.

“No problem” you think. “I won’t run the ‘drop column’ command because that will visit every block and take forever!”

So you settle on the perfect tool for such a scenario – simply mark the column as unused so that it is no longer available to application code and the developers that write that code.

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18c database creation on Windows

Hopefully you’ve followed my very simple and easy guide to downloading the 18c database software for Windows. But of course, software on its own is not much use – we need a database! So let’s get cracking and create one. Using the Start menu like I’ve done below, or using the Windows panels, locate the Database Configuration assistant and start it.

image

 

After a few seconds the initial screen will ask what you want to do.  Choose “Create Database”.

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Hyper-partitioned index avoidance thingamajig

As you can tell, I have no idea on a name for what I am about to describe. So let me start from the beginning, and set the scene for an idea I have to utilize a cool new 18c feature.

Often in a transactional-style system the busiest table (let us call it SALES for the sake of this discussion) is also

  • the biggest table, after all, it has all of our sales in it,
  • the most demanded for table, in that, almost every query in our application wants to access it in some way shape or form.

This is in effect the database version of the Pareto Principle. Everyone wants a slice of that SALES “pie”, and the piece of that pie that is in most demand is typically the most recent data. Your application may have pages that will be showing:

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18.3 As easy as 1…2…3

Well, finally it’s here! 18c for on-premise installation so the world can all get stuck into the cool new features of the latest release on their own laptops Smile  At least that is what I’ll be doing!

Naturally as soon as I heard the news, I downloaded the software and got ready to set aside the day for installation and creation of an 18c database. But I didn’t need that long – I didn’t need that long at all. Just a few clicks and a few commands and there it was – my 18c database up and running.

Check out how easy it is with my three videos.

Software Installation

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More triggers are better

Yes, you heard me correctly. If you have got one trigger on a table, then you might be surprised to find that perhaps having a second one will be a better option. Then again, I also love the sweet scent of a clickbaity, inflammatory blog post title to draw the readers in Smile so you’ll just have to read on to see which is true.

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DDL for constraints – subtle things

The DBMS_METADATA package is very cool. I remember the days of either hand-crafting DDL statements based on queries to the data dictionary, or many a DBA will be familiar with running “imp show=y” or “imp indexfile=…” in order to then laboriously extract the DDL required from the import log file.  DBMS_METADATA removed all of those annoyances to give us a simple API to get the true and complete DDL for a database object.

But when extracting DDL from the database using the DBMS_METADATA package, you need to be aware of some subtleties especially if you plan on executing that DDL in the database.

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