development

oraclealchemist's picture

The High Price of Data

Piggy Bank

You’ve purchased servers, storage space, switches, cables, and countless other pieces of hardware. The Oracle licenses are bought and paid for, Enterprise Edition with a few add-ons. All told, you’ve spent a small fortune on this infrastructure. It’s finally time to start up your database and begin using it for projects…

…Data gathers, and now your cost begins.

A Game of Clones

DBAs and other IT professionals (and sometimes naive executives) can fall into the trap of thinking that the up front costs of application building are all you have to consider for an application. To be honest, a lot of IT professionals don’t even think that far–we need components, we buy them. But the costs pile up far beyond the initial purchase.

oraclealchemist's picture

Hadoop Streaming, Hue, Oozie Workflows, and Hive

Elephant Painting

MapReduce with Hadoop Streaming in bash – Bonus!

oraclealchemist's picture

MapReduce with Hadoop Streaming in bash – Part 3

Hadoop Streaming Bash

oraclealchemist's picture

MapReduce with Hadoop Streaming in bash – Part 2

Hadoop Streaming Bash

oraclealchemist's picture

MapReduce with Hadoop Streaming in bash – Part 1

Hadoop Streaming Bash

arupnanda's picture

New York Oracle User Group Fall Conference Materials

Thank you all who attended my sessions at NYOUG Fall Conference this morning. I appreciate spending you most precious commodity - your time - with me. I sincerely hope you found both the presentations enlightening as well as entertaining.

Please see the details of the sessions below along with the download links.

Keynote: Oracle 12c Gee Whiz Features

Yet another Oracle version is out and so are about 1500 new features in a variety of areas. Some are well marketed (e.g. pluggable database or the multitenant option) and some shine by their sheer usefulness. And there are some that do not get a whole lot of coverage but are are hidden gems. In this session you learned 12 broad areas of Oracle Database 12c I feel are worth learning about to make your job as a DBA or developer better, easier, smoother and, in some cases, even make it possible what was hitherto impossible or impractical.

mwidlake's picture

DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO for Instrumentation

I just wanted to put up a post about DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO. This is a fantastic little built-in PL/SQL package that Oracle has provided since Oracle 8 to allow you to instrument your code. i.e record what it is doing. I’m a big fan of DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO and have used it several times to help identify where in an application time is being spent and how that pattern of time has altered.

Some PL/SQL developers use it and some don’t. It seems to me that it’s use comes down to where you work, as most PL/SQL developers are aware of it – but not everyone uses it (a friend of mine made the comment recently that “all good PL/SQL developers use it“. I can understand his point but don’t 100% agree).

mwidlake's picture

Friday Philosophy – Lead or Lag (When to Upgrade)?

I was involved in a discussion recently with Debra Lilley which version of Oracle to use. You can see her blog about it here (and she would love any further feedback from others). Oracle now has a policy that it will release the quarterly PSUs for a given point release for 12 months once that point release is superseded. ie once 11.2.0.3 came out, Oracle will only guarantee to provide PSUs for 11.2.0.2 for 12 months. See “My Oracle Support” note ID 742060.1. However, an older Terminal release such as 11.1.0.7 is not superseded and is supported until 2015 – and will get the quarterly PSU updates. This left the customer with an issue. Should they start doing their development on the latest and theoretically greatest version of Oracle and be forced to do a point upgrade “soon” to keep getting the PSUs, or use an older version of Oracle and avoid the need to upgrade?

mwidlake's picture

Oracle Nostalgia

When preparing the material for my “Oracle Lego – an introduction to Database Design” presentation for the UKOUG last week, I was looking back at my notes from a course on the topic from “a few years back”. There were a few bits which made me smile.

Oracle’s [SQL] implementation conforms to ANSI standard, although referential integrity will not be enforced until version 7

mwidlake's picture

Lack of Index and Constraint Comments

Something I’ve just reminded myself of is that under Oracle you cannot add a comment on an index or a constraint. You can only add comments on tables, views, materialized views, columns of those object types and a couple of esoteric things like Operators, Editions and Indextypes.

Here is an example of adding comments to tables and columns:

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