Execution plans

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12c pq_replicate

Another day, another airport lounge – another quick note: one of the changes that appeared in 12c was a tweak to the “broadcast” distribution option of parallel queries. I mentioned this in a footnote to a longer article a couple of months ago; this note simply expands on that brief comment with an example. We’ll start with a simple two-table hash join – which I’ll first construct and demonstrate in 11.2.0.4:

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Empty Hash

A little while ago I highlighted a special case with the MINUS operator (that one of the commentators extended to include the INTERSECT operator) relating to the way the second subquery would take place even if the first subquery produced no rows. I’ve since had an email from an Oracle employee letting me know that the developers looked at this case and decided that it wasn’t feasible to address it because – taking a wider view point – if the query were to run parallel they would need a mechanism that allowed some synchronisation between slaves so that every slave could find out that none of the slaves had received no rows from the first subquery, and this was going to lead to hanging problems.

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Predicate Order

Common internet question: does the order of predicates in the where clause make a difference.
General answer: It shouldn’t, but sometimes it will thanks to defects in the optimizer.

There’s a nicely presented example on the OTN database forum where predicate order does matter (between 10.1.x.x and 11.1.0.7). Notnne particularly – there’s a script to recreate the issue; note, also, the significance of the predicate section of the execution plan.
It’s bug 6782665, fixed in 11.2.0.1

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RAC Plans

Recently appeared on Mos – “Bug 18219084 : DIFFERENT EXECUTION PLAN ACROSS RAC INSTANCES”

Now, I’m not going to claim that the following applies to this particular case – but it’s perfectly reasonable to expect to see different plans for the same query on RAC, and it’s perfectly possible for the two different plans to have amazingly different performance characteristics; and in this particular case I can see an obvious reason why the two nodes could have different plans.

Here’s the query reported in the bug:

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12c fixed subquery

Here’s a simple little demonstration of an enhancement to the optimizer in 12c that may result in some interesting changes in execution plans as cardinality estimates change from “guesses” to accurate estimates.

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Minus

Here’s a little script to demonstrate an interesting observation that appeared in my email this morning (that’s morning Denver time):

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Optimisation

Here’s a recent request from the OTN database forum – how do you make this query go faster (tkprof output supplied):

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Conditional SQL – 4

This is one of those posts where the investigation is left as an exercise – it’s not difficult, just something that will take a little time that I don’t have, and just might end up with me chasing half a dozen variations (so I’d rather not get sucked into looking too closely). It comes from an OTN question which ends up reporting this predicate:

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Unnest Oddity

Here’s a little oddity I came across in 11.2.0.4 a few days ago – don’t worry too much about what the query is trying to do, or why it has been written the way I’ve done it, the only point I want to make is that I’ve got the same plan from two different strategies (according to the baseline/outline/hints), but the plans have a difference in cost.

Here’s the definition of my table and index, with query and execution plan:

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Parallel Execution – 3

It’s finally time to take a close look at the parallel versions of the execution plan I produced a little while ago for a four-table hash join. In this note I’ll examine the broadcast parallel distribution. First, here’s a list of the hints I’m going to use to get the effect I want:

	/*+
		leading(t4 t1 t2 t3)
		full(t4) parallel(t4, 2)
		use_hash(t1) swap_join_inputs(t1) pq_distribute(t1 none broadcast)
		full(t1) parallel(t1, 2)
		use_hash(t2) swap_join_inputs(t2) pq_distribute(t2 none broadcast)
		full(t2) parallel(t2, 2)
		use_hash(t3) swap_join_inputs(t3) pq_distribute(t3 none broadcast)
		full(t3) parallel(t3, 2)
		monitor
	*/

If you compare this set of hints to the hints I used for the serial plan you’ll see that the change involves two features:

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