Execution plans

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Delete Costs

One of the quirky little anomalies of the optimizer is that it’s not allowed to select rows from a table after doing an index fast full scan (index_ffs) even if it is obviously the most efficient (or, perhaps, least inefficient) strategy. For example:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Execution Plans

This is the index to a series of articles I’ve been writing for redgate, published on their AllThingsOracle site, about generating and reading execution plans. I’ve completed a few articles that haven’t yet been published, but I’ll add their URLs when they’re available.

I don’t really know how many parts it’s going to end up as – there’s an awful lot that that you could say about reading execution plans, even when you’re trying to cover just the basics; every time I’ve started writing an episode in the series it’s turned into two episodes.  I’ve delivered 5 parts to redgate so far; the active URLs below are the ones that they are currently online.

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Subquery with OR

Prompted by a pingback on this post, followed in very short order by a related question (with a most gratifying result) on Oracle-L, I decided to write up a note about another little optimizer enhancement that appeared in 12c. Here’s a query that differs slightly from the query in the original article:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Execution Plans

This is the index to a series of articles I’ve been writing for redgate, published on their AllThingsOracle site, about generating and interpreting execution plans.

When I started I didn’t really know how many parts it was going to end up as, I had thought maybe 5 or 6 but that was a wildly inaccurate estimate. It has finally ended at 14, and the last article will be published some time in the next week or so.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Costing Bug

It’s amazing how you can find little bugs (or anomalies) as soon as you start to look closely at how things work in Oracle. I started to write an article for All Things Oracle last night about execution plans with subqueries, so wrote a little script to generate some sample data, set up the first sample query, checked the execution plan, and stopped because the final cost didn’t make sense. Before going on I should point out that this probably doesn’t matter and probably wouldn’t cause a change in the execution plan if the calculation were corrected – but it is just an interesting indication of the odd things that can happen when sections of modular code are combined in an open-ended way. Here’s the query (running on 11.2.0.4) with execution plan:

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NL History

Even the simplest things change – here’s a brief history of nested loop joins, starting from 8i, based on the following query (with some hints):

select
	t2.n1, t1.n2
from
	t2,t1
where
	t2.n2 = 45
and	t2.n1 = t1.n1
;

There’s an index to support the join from t2 to t1, and I’ve forced an (unsuitable) index scan for the predicate on t2.

Basic plan for 8i (8.1.7.4)

As reported by $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin/utlxpls.sql.
Note the absence of a Predicate Information section.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Parallel Plans

I’ve popped this note to the top of the stack because I’ve added an index to Randolf Geist’s series on parallel execution skew, and included a reference his recent update to the XPLAN_ASH utility.

This is the directory for a short series I wrote discussing how to interpret parallel execution plans in newer versions of Oracle.

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Parallel Execution – 5

In the last article (I hope) of this series I want to look at what happens when I change the parallel distribution method on the query that I’ve been using in my previous demonstrations.  This was a query first introduced in a note on Bloom Filters (opens in a separate window) where I show two versions of a four-table parallel hash join, one using using the broadcast distribution mechanism throughout, the other using the hash distribution method. For reference you can review the table definitions and plan (with execution stats) for the serial join in this posting (also opens in a separate window).

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Subquery Anomaly

Here’s an oddity that appeared on the OTN database forum last night:

We have this query in our application which works fine in 9i but fails in 11gR2 (on Exadata) giving an “ORA-00937: not a single-group group function” error….

… The subquery is selecting a column and it doesn’t have a group by clause at all. I am not sure how is this even working in 9i. I always thought that on a simple query using an aggregate function (without any analytic functions / clause), we cannot select a column without having that column in the group by clause. So, how 11g behaves was not a surprise but surprised to see how 9i behaves. Can someone explain this behaviour?

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12c pq_replicate

Another day, another airport lounge – another quick note: one of the changes that appeared in 12c was a tweak to the “broadcast” distribution option of parallel queries. I mentioned this in a footnote to a longer article a couple of months ago; this note simply expands on that brief comment with an example. We’ll start with a simple two-table hash join – which I’ll first construct and demonstrate in 11.2.0.4:

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