Hints

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Recursive subquery factoring

This is possibly my longest title to date – I try to keep them short enough to fit the right hand column of the blog without wrapping – but I couldn’t think of a good way to shorten it (Personally I prefer to use the expression CTE – common table expression – over “factored subquery” or “subquery factoring” or “with subquery”, and that would have achieved my goal, but might not have meant anything to most people.)

If you haven’t come across them before, recursive CTEs appeared in 11.2, are in the ANSI standard, and are (probably) viewed by Oracle as the strategic replacement for “connect by” queries. Here’s a simple (and silly) example:

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Caution – hints

Here’s a little example of why you should be very cautious about implementing undocumented discoveries. If you take a look at the view v$sql_hints in 11.2.0.4 you’ll discover a hint (no_)cluster_by_rowid; and if you look in v$parameter you’ll discover two new parameters _optimizer_cluster_by_rowid and _optimizer_cluster_by_rowid_control.

It doesn’t take much imagination to guess that the parameters and hint have something to do with the costs of accessing compressed data by rowid on an Exadata system (see, for example, this posting) and it’s very easy to check what the hint does:

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RAC Plans

Recently appeared on Mos – “Bug 18219084 : DIFFERENT EXECUTION PLAN ACROSS RAC INSTANCES”

Now, I’m not going to claim that the following applies to this particular case – but it’s perfectly reasonable to expect to see different plans for the same query on RAC, and it’s perfectly possible for the two different plans to have amazingly different performance characteristics; and in this particular case I can see an obvious reason why the two nodes could have different plans.

Here’s the query reported in the bug:

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Index Hash

I’m afraid this is one of my bad puns again – an example of the optimizer  making a real hash of the index hash join. I’m going to create a table with several indexes (some of them rather similar to each other) and execute a query that should do an index join between the obvious two indexes. To show how obvious the join should be I’m going to start with a couple of queries that show the cost of simple index fast full scans.

Here’s the data generating code:

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Unnest Oddity

Here’s a little oddity I came across in 11.2.0.4 a few days ago – don’t worry too much about what the query is trying to do, or why it has been written the way I’ve done it, the only point I want to make is that I’ve got the same plan from two different strategies (according to the baseline/outline/hints), but the plans have a difference in cost.

Here’s the definition of my table and index, with query and execution plan:

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Hinting

I’ve spent so many years trying to explain that a “hint” to the Oracle optimizer is an order – if you know how to do it properly – that I finally decided to list the manual references that have made this point over the last 15 or so years. Here’s the list, which ends with a surprising change of flavour. (Emphasis in the body of the text is mine).

From the 8.1.7 manual

Using Hints

As an application designer, you may know information about your data that the optimizer does not know. For example, you may know that a certain index is more selective for certain queries. Based on this information, you may be able to choose a more efficient execution plan than the optimizer. In such a case, use hints to force the optimizer to use the optimal execution plan.

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Hash Joins

I’ve written notes about the different joins in the past – but such things are always worth revisiting, so here’s an accumulated bundle of comments about hash joins.

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Index Hints

In my last post I made a comment about how the optimizer will use the new format of the index hint to identify an index that is an exact match if it can, and any index that starts with the same columns (in the right order) if it can’t find an exact match. It’s fairly easy to demonstrate the behaviour in 11g by examining the 10053 (CBO) trace file generated by a simple, single table, query – in fact, this is probably a case that Doug Burns might want to cite as an example of how, sometimes, the 10053 is easy to interpret (in little patches):

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Invisible ?

I’ll probably have to file this one under “Optimizer ignoring hints” – except that it should also go under “bugs”, and that’s one of the get-out clauses I use in my “hints are not hints” argument.

Sometimes an invisible index isn’t completely invisible.

Here’s a demonstration from 11.2.0.3 showing something which, to my mind, is a very annoying problem. The objects are in a tablespace that has been created with uniform extents of 1MB on an 8KB block size, using freelist management. I’ve rigged the Hakan factor to ensure that I get exactly 40 rows per block, and I’ve set the system statistics to ensure that a relatively small swing in cost results in a change in execution plan.

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Hints again

A recent posting on OTN came up with a potentially interesting problem – it started roughly like this:

I have two queries like this:

select * from emp where dept_id=10 and emp_id=15;
select * from emp where dept_id=10 and emp_id=16;

When I run them separately I get the execution plan I want, but when I run a union of the two the plans change.

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