Hints

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Subquery Order

From time to time I’ve wanted to optimize a query by forcing Oracle to execute existence (or non-existence) subqueries in the correct order because I know which subquery will eliminate most data most efficiently, and it’s always a good idea to look for ways to eliminate early. I’ve only just discovered (which doing some tests on 18c) that Oracle 12.2.0.1 introduced the /*+ order_subq() */ hint that seems to be engineered to do exactly that.

Here’s a very simple (and completely artificial) demonstration of use.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

pushing predicates

I came across this odd limitation (maybe defect) with pushing predicates (join predicate push down) a few years ago that made a dramatic difference to a client query when fixed but managed to hide itself rather cunningly until you looked closely at what was going on. Searching my library for something completely different I’ve just rediscovered the model I built to demonstrate the issue so I’ve tested it against a couple of newer versions  of Oracle (including 18.1) and found that the anomaly still exists. It’s an interesting little detail about checking execution plans properly so I’ve written up the details. The critical feature of the problem is a union all view:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Hacking Profiles

Saturday’s posting about setting cursor_sharing to force reminded me about one of the critical limitations of SQL Profiles (which is one of those little reason why you shouldn’t be hacking SQL Profiles as a substitute for SQL Plan Baselines). Here’s a demo (taking advantage of some code that I think Kerry Osborne published several years ago) of creating an SQL Profile from the current execution plan of a simple statement – first we create some data and find the sql_id and child_number for a simple query:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Conditional SQL – 5

Here’s a note that has been sitting around for more than 3 years (the draft date is Jan 2015), waiting for me to finish it off; and in that time we’ve got a new version of Oracle that changes the solution to the problem it presented. (I also managed to write “Conditional SQL –  6” in the intervening period !)

This posting started with a question on the OTN (now ODC) database forum about an execution plan used by 11.2.0.3.  Here’s a model to represent the data and the query:

davidkurtz's picture

nVision Performance Tuning 12: Hinting nVision with SQL Profiles

This blog post is part of a series that discusses how to get optimal performance from PeopleSoft nVision reporting as used in General Ledger.  It is a PeopleSoft specific version of a posting on my Oracle blog.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

dbms_sqldiag

If you’re familiar with SQL Profiles and SQL Baselines you may also know about SQL Patches – a feature that allows you to construct hints that you can attach to SQL statements at run-time without changing the code. Oracle 12c Release 2 introduces a couple of important changes to this feature:

  • It’s now official – the feature had been copied from package dbms_sqldiag_internal to package dbms_sqldiag.
  • The limitation of 500 characters has been removed from the hint text – it’s now a CLOB column.

H/T to Nigel Bayliss for including this detail in his presentation to the UKOUG last week, and pointing out that it’s also available for Standard Edition.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Parallelism

Headline – if you don’t want to read the note – the /*+ parallel(N) */ hint doesn’t mean a query will use parallel execution, even if there are enough parallel execution server processes to make it possible. The parallel(N) hint tells the optimizer to consider the cost of using parallel execution for each path that it examines, but ultimately the optimizer will still take the lowest cost path (bar the odd few special cases) and that path could turn out to be a serial path.

The likelihood of parallelism appearing for a given query changes across versions of Oracle so you can be fooled into thinking you’re seeing bugs as you test new versions but it’s (almost certainly) the same old rule being applied in different circumstances. Here’s an example – which I’ll start off on 11.2.0.4:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Parallel First_rows()

A recent posting on OTN raised the question of whether or not the “parallel” hint and the “first_rows(n)” hint were mutually incompatible. This reminded me that from time to time other posters on OTN (copying information from various websites, perhaps) have claimed that “parallel doesn’t work with first rows” or, conversely, “first rows doesn’t work with parallel”. This is one of those funny little myths that is so old that the script I’ve got to demonstrate the misconception is dated 2003 with a first test version of 8.1.7.4.

Since I haven’t run the test on any version of Oracle newer than 9.2.0.4 I thought it was time to dust it down, modernise it slightly, and run it again. So here’s the bit that creates a sample data set:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

use_nl hint

In response to a recent lamentation from Richard Foote about the degree of ignorance regarding the clustering_factor of indexes I commented on the similar level of understanding of a specific hint syntax, namely use_nl(a b) pointing out that this does not mean “do a nested loop from a to b”. My comment was underscored by a fairly prompt response asking what the hint did mean.

iggy_fernandez's picture

Believe it or Not: Converting an Inner Join to an Outer Join to improve performance

The cost-based optimizer tries to merge views whenever possible but sometimes we ma y want to override this behavior; that is, we may want the optimizer to push predicates into the view instead of merging the view into the main query. If the main query performs an inner join to the view, it becomes necessary to convert the inner join to an outer join if the database version is less than 12.1.0.2.(read more)

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