Infrastructure

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Redo Dumps

A thread started on the Oracle-L list-server a few days ago asking for help analysing a problem where a simple “insert values()” (that handled millions of rows per day) was running very slowly. There are many reasons why this might happen, ranging from the trivial (someone has locked the table in exclusive mode), through the slightly subtle (we’re trying to insert a row that collides on a uniqueness constraint with an uncommitted insert from another session) to the subtle (Oracle has to read through the undo to check current versions of blocks against read-consistent versions) ending up at the esoteric (the ASSM space management blocks are completely messed up again).

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Re-partitioning 2

Last week I wrote a note about turning a range-partitioned table into a range/list composite partitioned table using features included in 12.2 of Oracle. But my example was really just an outline of the method and bypassed a number of the little extra problems you’re likely to see in a real-world system, so in this note I’m going to bring in an issue that you might run into – and which I’ve seen appearing a number of times: ORA-14097: column type or size mismatch in ALTER TABLE EXCHANGE PARTITION.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Re-partitioning – 18

In yesterday’s note on the options for converting a range-partioned table into a composite range/list parititioned table I mentioned that you could do this online with a single command in 18c, so here’s some demonstration code to demonstrate that claim:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Re-partitioning

I wrote a short note a little while ago demonstrating how flexible Oracle 12.2 can be about physically rebuilding a table online to introduce or change the partitioning while discarding data, and so on.  But what do you do (as a recent question on ODC asked) if you want to upgrade a customer’s database to meet the requirements of a new release of your application by changing a partitioned table into a composite partitioned table and don’t have enough room to do an online rebuild. Which could require two copies of the data to exist at the same time.)

If you’ve got the down time (and not necessarily a lot is needed) you can fall back on “traditional methods” with some 12c enhancements. Let’s start with a range partitioned table:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

LOB length

This note is a reminder combined with a warning about unexpected changes as you move from version to version. Since it involves LOBs (large objects) it may not be relevant for most people but since there’s a significant change in the default character set for the database as you move up to 18.3 (or maybe even as you move to 12.2) anyone using character LOBs may get a surprise.

Here’s a simple script that I’m first going to run on an instance of 11.2.0.4:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Parse Calls

When dealing with the library cache / shared pool it’s always worth checking from time to time to see if a new version of Oracle has changed any of the statistics you rely on as indicators of potential problems. Today is also (coincidentally) a day when comments about “parses” and “parse calls” entered my field of vision from two different directions. I’ve tweeted out references to a couple of quirkly little posts I did some years ago about counting parse calls and what a parse call may entail, but I thought I’d finish the day off with a little demo of what the session cursor cache does for you when your client code issues parse calls.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Describe Upgrade

Here’s an odd little change between Oracle versions that could have a stunning impact on the application performance if the thing that generates your client code happens to use an unlucky selection of constructs.  It’s possible to demonstrate the effect remarkably easily – you just have to describe a table, doing it lots of times to make it easy to see what’s happening.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

sys_op_lbid

I’ve made use of the function a few times in the past, for example in this posting on the dangers of using reverse key indexes, but every time I’ve mentioned it I’ve only been interested in the “leaf blocks per key” option. There are actually four different variations of the function, relevant to different types of index and controlled by setting a flag parameter to one of 4 different values.

The call to sys_op_lbid() take 3 parameters: index (or index [sub]partition object id, a flag vlaue, and a table “rowid”, where the flag value can be one of L, R, O, or G. The variations of the call are as follows:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Append hint

One of the questions that came up on the CBO Panel Session at the UKOUG Tech2018 conference was about the /*+ append */ hint – specifically how to make sure it was ignored when it came from a 3rd party tool that was used to load data into the database. The presence of the hint resulted in increasing amounts of space in the table being “lost” as older data was deleted by the application which then didn’t reuse the space the inserts always went above the table’s highwater mark; and it wasn’t possible to change the application code.

The first suggestion aired was to create an SQL Patch to associate the hint /*+ ignore_optim_embedded_hints */ with the SQL in the hope that this would make Oracle ignore the append hint. This won’t work, of course, because the append hint is not an optimizer hint, it’s a “behaviour” hint.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

DML Tablescans

This note is a follow-up to a recent comment a blog note about Row Migration:

So I wonder what is the difference between the two, parallel dml and serial dml with parallel scan, which makes them behave differently while working with migrated rows. Why might the strategy of serial dml with parallel scan case not work in parallel dml case? I am going to make a service request to get some clarifications but maybe I miss something obvious?

The comment also referenced a couple of MoS notes:

To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.
Syndicate content