Infrastructure

Jonathan Lewis's picture

12c Temporary

Just one of those little snippets to cover something new and remind of something old. A single session can now have three (or more) temporary tablespaces in use at the same time for different reasons.

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Duplicate database

One of the people attending my seminar in Munich last week has emailed me some details about a nasty little surprise you may get if you’re thinking about TSPITR (tablespace point in time recovery), and happen to have a few materialized views in your database.

You might have wanted to use the “duplicate target database”  from rman with the “skip tablespace” option to create a duplicate database, excluding tablespaces that you’re not interested in, if you needed to recover a particular tablespace (or set of tablespaces) to a specific point in time.  (Once you’ve done that you can extract the data that you want and then discard the duplicate database). But there’s a requirement for recovery is that the set of tablespaces should be “self-contained”; but what does “self-contained” mean ?

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Auto Sample Size

In the past I have enthused mightily about the benefits of the approximate NDV mechanism and the benefit of using auto_sample_size to collect statistics in 11g; however, as so often happens with Oracle features, there’s a down-side or boundary condition, or edge case. I’ve already picked this up once as an addendum to an earlier blog note on virtual stats, which linked to an article on OTN describing how the time taken to collect stats on a table increased dramatically after the addition of an index – where the index had this definition:

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Indexing LOBs

Many years ago, possibly when most sites were still using Oracle 8i, a possible solution to a particular customer problem was to create a function-based index on a CLOB column using the dbms_lob.getlength() function call. I can’t find the notes explaining why this was necessary (I usually have some sort of clue – such as the client name – in the script, but in this case all I had was a comment that “the manuals say you can’t do this, but it works provided you wrap the dbms_lob call inside a deterministic function”).

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Index Compression – aargh

The problem with telling people that some feature of Oracle is a “good thing” is that some of those people will go ahead and use it; and if enough people use it some of them will discover a hitherto undiscovered defect. Almost inevitably the bug will turn out to be one of those “combinations” bugs that leaves you thinking: “Why the {insert preferred expression of disbelief here} should {feature X} have anything to do with {feature Y}”.

Here – based on index compression, as you may have guessed from the title – is one such bug. I got it first on 11.1.0.7, but it’s still there on 11.2.0.4 and 12.1.0.1

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Row Migration

At one of the presentations I attended at RMOUG this year the presenter claimed that if a row kept increasing in size and had to migrate from block to block as a consequence then each migration of that row would leave a pointer in the previous block so that an indexed access to the row would start at the original table block and have to follow an ever growing chain of pointers to reach the data.

This is not correct, and it’s worth making a little fuss about the error since it’s the sort of thing that can easily become an urban legend that results in people rebuilding tables “for performance” when they don’t need to.

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IOT Catalogue

I’ve just added a catalogue of Richard Foote’s articles on IOTs to the list I made a couple of years ago of Martin Widlake’s articles, so this is just a temporary note to point people to the updated list.

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Clustaghhh!

It doesn’t matter which bit of Oracle technology you want to use, eventually someone, somewhere, runs into the special case where something nasty happens. Here’s an edge case for people using (index) clusters – Oracle Bug  17866999 ora-1499 for cluster following rman convert

It comes from a conversation on Oracle-L where Jack van Zanen reported a problem of inconsistent results after migrating data between platforms using rman to converts some tablespaces containing index clusters. This is the starting post where he shows a query that is clearly getting the wrong answer (select where channel_number = 503 obviously shouldn’t return data with channel_number 501).

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Single block reads

When a “cache read” tablescan (or index fast full scan) takes place we generally expect to see waits on “db file scattered read” as Oracle performs multi-block reads to do the scan. But we all know that Oracle will skip over blocks that are already in the cache and can therefore end up doing multi-block reads of many different sizes, even down to the point where it does single block reads (waiting for “db file sequential read”).

A quirky little question came up on OTN a little while ago: “for a large table we expect multiblock reads to be positioned at the end of the LRU for prompt re-use; but when Oracle does a single block read as part of a tablescan does it go to the end of the LRU (because it’s part of a large tablescan) or does it go to the mid-point of the LRU (because it’s a single block read)?”

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xDollar

I see Tanel has just started a short series of articles on where the X$ data come from so, for those with time on their hands (?anyone?) here’s a little script I wrote a few years ago when I wanted to check which v$ objects corresponded to the same internal structure in the SGA: (as v$session and v$session_wait used to)

It starts with a function that has to be created in the SYS schema – so no doing this on production systems. The it’s a pipelined function so that we can treat its output like a table, which means I need to create an object type and a table type before creating the function.  In the function I select each x$ name from the list of x$ names (x$kqfta) and for each table I construct a dynamic SQL statement selecting the first row from the table.

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