Internals

fritshoogland's picture

Oracle internal data dictionary oddity

This blogpost is about an inconsistency I found in the X$ tables X$KQFTA and X$KQFCO. This is very specific. If you don’t care about that, you can skip this post.

The Oracle database’s “dynamic performance views” are views that are prefixed with “GV$” and “V$”. The “G” with “GV$” stands for “global” and gets you the results from its “V$” equivalent for all instances. In most cases, but that’s not the purpose of this blog. In most cases, the “V$” version simply is the “GV$” view with inst_id (instance id, used in RAC to specify the instance id) set to the current instance. I’ll refer to both simply as “V$” for simplicity.

The “V$” views are mostly build on top of “X$” tables. The “X$” tables are Oracle internal tables, and not officially supported, therefore you should use the “V$” views.

fritshoogland's picture

What’s new with Oracle database 19.5 versus 19.4

It seems that the most eye-catching difference between Oracle database versions 19.5 and 19.4 is three underscore parameters spare parameters being changed to specifically named underscore parameters, two of them have a bug number in them which is not publicly visible.

In v$sysstat/v$sesstat, a group of statistics are renamed from ‘OS %’ to ‘Server %’. All these statistics are about networking. One changed parameter directly points to networking (tcpinfo). These statistics are added in version 19.

One DBA view was added: DBA_DV_COMMON_OPERATION_STATUS. This view is specific and owned by to DVSYS.

fritshoogland's picture

Oracle memory troubleshooting using analysis on heapdumps, part 2

In the article oracle memory troubleshooting using analysis on heap dumps I introduced heap_analyze.awk.

The reason the tool exists is because I am using it myself. Therefore, I ran into additional things that I wanted the tool to do. I added some stuff, which is that significant, that I decided to make another blogpost to introduce the new features.

1. Percentages
In order to get an idea of the relative size of the summarised topic, I added a percentage. For example:

fritshoogland's picture

Oracle memory troubleshooting using analysis on heapdumps

This blogpost is about analysing Oracle heap dumps. It is an extension to earlier work, Tanel Poder’s heap dump analyzer. So hat tip to Tanel, he’s done the hard work, I merely increased the presentation options. The heap analyser script that I wrote analyses Oracle heapdumps from the trace file that the dump was written to by the Oracle database. Because the heap dump representation is the same between PGA and SGA memory, it can work on both. The reason for this is that memory management is done by the same memory manager, and is commonly called ‘kgh’ (kernel generic heap) managed memory.

Please mind that for PGA analysis, not all memory is managed by the kgh memory manager. For example memory used for networking (sqlnet) is allocated totally outside of the kgh memory manager.

fritshoogland's picture

What’s new with Oracle database 12.2.0.1.190416 versus 12.2.0.1.190716

There are a couple of underscore parameters changed from spare to named ones.
It’s interesting to see that in sysstat, ‘spare statistic 2’ changed to ‘cell XT granule IO bytes saved by HDFS tbs extent map scan’. This obviously has to do with big data access via cell servers. What is weird is that this is the only version where this had happened.

fritshoogland's picture

Oracle wait event ‘TCP Socket (KGAS)’

I was asked some time ago what the Oracle database event ‘TCP socket (KGAS)’ means. This blogpost is a deep dive into what this event times in Oracle database 12.1.0.2.180717.

This event is not normally seen, only when TCP connections are initiated from the database using packages like UTL_TCP, UTL_SMTP and the one used in this article, UTL_HTTP.

A very basic explanation is this event times the time that a database foreground session spends on TCP connection management and communicating over TCP, excluding client and database link (sqlnet) networking. If you trace the system calls, you see that mostly that is working with a (network) socket. Part of the code in the oracle database that is managing that, sits in the kernel code layer kgas, kernel generic (of which I am quite sure, and then my guess:) asynchronous services, which explains the naming of the event.

Kamil Stawiarski's picture

AMM vs security

Most of us already know that AMM sucks. But usually, we think about disadvantages of AMM in terms of performance. Let’s see why it sucks in the terms of security </p />
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fritshoogland's picture

A look into oracle redo, part 11: log writer worker processes

Starting from Oracle 12, in a default configured database, there are more log writer processes than the well known ‘LGWR’ process itself, which are the ‘LGnn’ processes:

$ ps -ef | grep test | grep lg
oracle   18048     1  0 12:50 ?        00:00:13 ora_lgwr_test
oracle   18052     1  0 12:50 ?        00:00:06 ora_lg00_test
oracle   18056     1  0 12:50 ?        00:00:00 ora_lg01_test

These are the log writer worker processes, for which the minimal amount is equal to the amount public redo strands. Worker processes are assigned to a group, and the group is assigned to a public redo strand. The amount of worker processes in the group is dependent on the undocumented parameter “_max_log_write_parallelism”, which is one by default.

fritshoogland's picture

A look into oracle redo: index and overview

I gotten some requests to provide an overview of the redo series of blogposts I am currently running. Here it is:

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A look into oracle redo, part 10: commit_wait and commit_logging

The redo series would not be complete without writing about changing the behaviour of commit. There are two ways to change commit behaviour:

1. Changing waiting for the logwriter to get notified that the generated redo is persisted. The default is ‘wait’. This can be set to ‘nowait’.
2. Changing the way the logwriter handles generated redo. The default is ‘immediate’. This can be set to ‘batch’.

There are actually three ways these changes can be made:
1. As argument of the commit statement: ‘commit’ can be written as ‘commit write wait immediate’ (statement level).
2. As a system level setting. By omitting an explicit commit mode when executing the commit command, the setting as set with the parameters commit_wait (default: wait) and commit_logging (default: immediate).
3. As a session level setting. By omitting an explicit commit mode, but by setting either commit_wait or commit_logging it overrides the settings at the system level.

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