Internals

Franck Pachot's picture

Multitenant dictionary: what is consolidated and what is not

The documentation says that for Reduction of duplication and Ease of database upgrade the Oracle-supplied objects such as data dictionary table definitions and PL/SQL packages are represented only in the root.

Unfortunately, this is only partly true. System PL/SQL packages are only in root but system table definition are replicated into all PDBs.

This post is an extension of a previous blog post which was on 12cR1. This one is on 12cR2.

fritshoogland's picture

Oracle C functions annotations

Warning! This is a post about Oracle database internals for internals lovers and researchers. For normal, functional administration, this post serves no function. The post shows a little tool I created which consists of a small database I compiled with Oracle database C function names and a script to query it. The reason that keeping such a database makes sense in the first place, is because the Oracle C functions for the Oracle database are setup in an hierarchy based on the function name. This means you can deduct what part of the execution you are in by looking at the function name; for example ‘kslgetl’ means kernel service lock layer, get latch.

To use this, clone git repository at https://gitlab.com/FritsHoogland/ora_functions.git

Kamil Stawiarski's picture

Direct path insert and IOTs

(Please tell me that I’m not the only one who thinks "Index Organized Table" instead of "Internet Of Things" when hearing IOT…)

This post is inspired by Connor McDonald and his blog post from a year ago about direct mode operations and IOTs.
You can read it here: https://connor-mcdonald.com/2016/07/04/direct-mode-operations-on-iots/amp/

While writing a redo parser for V00D00 I had to investigate this subject very closely from a redo log perspective. And this will be the subject of my 10-minute lightning talk at Oak Table World 2017 at Oracle Open World!

Kamil Stawiarski's picture

rollback internals

While researching redo log internals for V00D00 we had to face the fact, that we know shit about real transactional behavior. When I say "real", I mean – under the hood.
Even with a very simple stuff like COMMIT and ROLLBACK we were constantly amazed by the internal mechanisms.

Today let’s take ROLLBACK under the investigation. According to documentation:

The ROLLBACK statement ends the current transaction and undoes any changes made during that transaction.

Cool. But what it means? First of all, you have to realize that all changes in redo logs are in a form of REDO RECORD which has its own address, known as RBA or RS_ID.

Sample RS_ID (RBA) looks like this: 0x00000a.00008c0f.006c

mwidlake's picture

Free Webinar – How Oracle Works!

Next Tuesday (19th September) I am doing a free webinar for ProHuddle. It lasts under an hour and is an introduction to how some of the core parts of the Oracle RDBMS work, I call it “The Heart of Oracle: How the Core RDBMS Works”. Yes, I try and explain all of the core Oracle RDBMS in under an hour! I’m told I just about manage it. You can see details of the event and register for it here. I’ve done this talk a few times at conferences now and I really like doing it, partly as it seems to go down so well and people give me good feedback about it (and occasionally bad feedback, but I’ll get on to that).

fritshoogland's picture

The full table scan direct path read decision for version 12.2

This post is about the decision the Oracle database engine makes when it is using a full segment scan approach. The choices the engine has is to store the blocks that are physically read in the buffercache, or read the blocks into the process’ PGA. The first choice is what I refer to as a ‘buffered read’, which places the block in the database buffercache so the process itself and other processes can bypass the physical read and use the block from the cache, until the block is evicted from the cache. The second choice is what is commonly referred to as ‘direct path read’, which places the blocks physically read into the process’ PGA, which means the read blocks are stored for only a short duration and is not shared with other processes.

Kamil Stawiarski's picture

When UPDATE becomes an INSERT

During a research for VOODOO, we came across a lot of interesting stuff inside REDO.
One of my favourites is an UPDATE, becoming an INSERT </p />
</p></div>
    <div class=»

oakroot's picture

When UPDATE becomes an INSERT

During a research for VOODOO, we came across a lot of interesting stuff inside REDO.
One of my favourites is an UPDATE, becoming an INSERT </p />
</p></div>
    <div class='clearfix'></div>  </div>
  <div class=

fritshoogland's picture

Postgresql block internals, part 2

This is the second part of a blogpost about Postgresql database block internals. If you found this blogpost, and are interested in getting started with it, please read the first part, and then continue with this post.
I am doing the investigations on Oracle Linux 7u3 with postgres 9.6 (both the latest versions when this blogpost was written).

In the first part I talked about the pageinspect extension, and investigated the page header and line pointer array. This blogpost looks at the actual tuples, including the index, and how these are stored in the pages.

fritshoogland's picture

Postgresql block internals

This blogpost is the result of me looking into how postgres works, and specifically the database blocks. The inspiration and essence of this blogpost comes from two blogs from Jeremiah Peschka: https://facility9.com/2011/03/postgresql-row-storage-fundamentals/ and https://facility9.com/2011/04/postgresql-update-internals/
I am using Oracle Linux 7u3 and postgres 9.6 (current versions when this blogpost was written).

Postgres is already installed, and a database cluster is already running. Let’s create a database ‘test’ for the sake of our tests:

$ createdb test

Once the database is created, logging on is done with ‘psql’:

To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.
Syndicate content