Internals

fritshoogland's picture

A performance deep dive into column encryption

Actually, this is a follow up post from my performance deep dive into tablespace encryption. After having investigated how tablespace encryption works, this blogpost is looking at the other encryption option, column encryption. A conclusion that can be shared upfront is that despite they basically perform the same function, the implementation and performance consequences are quite different.

oakroot's picture

ODBV improvements

Thanks to suggestions made by Frits Hoogland, I made some improvements to the ODBV. The new version can be found here: http://ora-600.pl/oinstall/odbv.x86_64

The changes are:

  • Recognition of first, second and third level bitmap block
  • Recognition of pagetable segment header
  • Block number ranges on the left side

The blocks will be coloured properly to belonging segment.

Kamil Stawiarski's picture

ODBV improvements

Thanks to suggestions made by Frits Hoogland, I made some improvements to the ODBV. The new version can be found here: http://ora-600.pl/oinstall/odbv.x86_64

The changes are:

  • Recognition of first, second and third level bitmap block
  • Recognition of pagetable segment header
  • Block number ranges on the left side

The blocks will be coloured properly to belonging segment.

fritshoogland's picture

Oracle 12.2 wait event ‘PGA memory operation’

When sifting through a sql_trace file from Oracle version 12.2, I noticed a new wait event: ‘PGA memory operation’:

WAIT #0x7ff225353470: nam='PGA memory operation' ela= 16 p1=131072 p2=0 p3=0 obj#=484 tim=15648003957

The current documentation has no description for it. Let’s see what V$EVENT_NAME says:

SQL> select event#, name, parameter1, parameter2, parameter3, wait_class 
  2  from v$event_name where name = 'PGA memory operation';

EVENT# NAME                                  PARAMETER1 PARAMETER2 PARAMETER3 WAIT_CLASS
------ ------------------------------------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------------
   524 PGA memory operation                                                   Other

Well, that doesn’t help…

oakroot's picture

back to the basics: ALTER TABLE MOVE vs SHRINK

It’s time for the next article with ODBV visualisation </p />
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Kamil Stawiarski's picture

back to the basics: ALTER TABLE MOVE vs SHRINK

It’s time for the next article with ODBV visualisation </p />
</p></div>
    <div class=»

Kamil Stawiarski's picture

back to the basics: truncate table reuse storage vs drop storage

From time to time I get questions on my trainings, what is the difference between TRUNCATE TABLE and TRUNCATE TABLE DROP STORAGE… well, there is no difference because DROP STORAGE is default </p />
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fritshoogland's picture

Advanced Oracle memory profiling using pin tool ‘pinatrace’

In my previous post, I introduced Intel Pin. If you are new to pin, please follow this link to my previous post on how to set it up and how to run it.

One of the things you can do with Pin, is profile memory access. Profiling memory access using the pin tool ‘pinatrace’ is done in the following way:

$ cd ~/pin/pin-3.0-76991-gcc-linux
$ ./pin -pid 12284 -t source/tools/SimpleExamples/obj-intel64/pinatrace.so

The pid is a pid of an oracle database foreground process. Now execute something in the session you attached pin to and you find the ‘pinatrace’ output in $ORACLE_HOME/dbs:

fritshoogland's picture

Introduction to Intel Pin

This blogpost is an introduction to Intel’s Pin dynamic instrumentation framework. Pin and the pintools were brought to my attention by Mahmoud Hatem in his blogpost Tracing Memory access of an oracle process: Intel PinTools. The Pin framework provides an API that abstracts instruction-set specifics (on the CPU layer). Because this is a dynamic binary instrumentation tool, it requires no recompiling of source code. This means we can use it with programs like the Oracle database executable.
The Pin framework download comes with a set of pre-created tools called ‘Pintools’. Some of these tools are really useful for Oracle investigation and research.

marco's picture

Oracle 12cR2: Database parameters

For those in a desperate need to learn all 4841 database parameter variations of the…

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