linux

dbakevlar's picture

Linux for the SQL Server DBA, Part III

Yes, there’s a Part III!

You’re going to have to start scripting and now that you know a few VI/VIM commands, lets talk beginning scripting with shell.

In our example below, we’re going to start a new project called “test”.  For this, the requirements are:

dbakevlar's picture

Why SQL Server Shouldn’t Run as Root on Linux

So more than one person contacted me about my last post and stated that they didn’t see a problem with SQL Server on Linux running as the root user.

Me:

dbakevlar's picture

Linux 101 for SQL Server DBAs, Part II

Linux has become a clear area of required learning for SQL Server DBAs in as of SQL Server 2016.  What?  You didn’t read that right, you say?  Yes, while a Linux edition was introduced in SQL Server 2016, it was pushed to the forefront with the release of 2017, along with Python in a push towards stronger DevOps initiatives, (one OS to rule them all!) and Python to assist with even stronger analytics trends.

fritshoogland's picture

Introduction to pinatrace annotate version 2: a look into latches again

This post is an introduction to pinatrace annotate version 2, which is a tool to annotate the output of the Intel Pin tools ‘pinatrace’ tool.

The pinatrace tool generates a file with every single memory access of a process. Please realise what this means: this is every single read from main memory or write to main memory from the CPU. This allows you to get an understanding what happens within a C function. This means you can determine what information or data is accessed in what function. Needless to say this is a tool for internals investigations and research, not something for normal daily database maintenance and support. Also, the performance of the process that you attached to is severely impacted, and it can only be turned off by stopping the process. Do not use this on a production database, use this at your own risk for research and investigational purposes only.

martin.bach's picture

Little things worth knowing: redo transport in Data Guard 12.2 part 2

In the first part of this article I looked at a number of views and some netstat output to show how redo is transported from the primary database to its standby systems. The long story short is that TT02 (“async ORL multi”) was found sending redo to CDB3 asynchronously whilest NSS2 (“sync”) transferred redo to the synchronised target – CDB2. Unlike v$dataguard_process wanted me to believe, it really wasn’t LGWR sending redo over the network.

In this little article I would like to show you how the standby databases CDB2 and CDB3 receive redo and how you can map this back to the primary database, closing the loop.

dbakevlar's picture

UKOUG and Microsoft Marathon Webinar

I’m here for the last day of #0000ff;">UKOUG Tech17 and it’s been an awesome event.  This is my first time to this event while in Birmingham and although quite the party town on the weekends, its a great city to have an event like UKOUG’s trio of events during the week.

dbakevlar's picture

SQL Server 2017 on Linux- Processes

So while finishing up my slides for the Microsoft Pass Linux Marathon webinar on Dec. 13th, Tim and I started to discuss the apples vs. oranges comparison of SQL Server on Linux process management vs. an Oracle instance.

tanelpoder's picture

Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting seminar in 2018!

A lot of people have asked me to do another run of my Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting training or at least get access to previous recordings – so I decided to geek out over the holiday period, update the material with latest stuff and run one more AOT class in 2018!

The online training will take place on 29 January – 2 February 2018 (Part 1) & 26 February – 2 March 2018 (Part 2).

The latest TOC is below:

Seminar registration details:

martin.bach's picture

Little things worth knowing: scheduler jobs and Instance Caging

While updating material for a training class about Database Resource Management I briefly wondered if Instance Caging should apply for scheduler jobs as well. The obvious answer is “yes”, but I wanted to find proof. I hope I did in the end, and wanted to share how I got there.

The test environment

My system is based on the shiny new AMD Ryzen 7 1700X Eight-Core Processor, and it shows as 1s8c16t. I really like it! My 12.2.0.1 database named DEMO is patched to August 2017 – 12.2.0.1.170814 to be precise. It’s difficult to test resource management, and specifically Instance Caging, with a dual-core laptop, so this machine should help!

Test setup

Apart from the database workload I am soon going to launch the system is otherwise idle. I set cpu_count to 4 and made sure I had a resource manager plan active:

fritshoogland's picture

Oracle 12.1 big table caching IO code path

Recently I was triggered about the ‘automatic big table caching’ feature introduced in Oracle version 12.1.0.2 with Roger Macnicol’s blogpost about Oracle database IO and caching or not caching (https://blogs.oracle.com/smartscan-deep-dive/when-bloggers-get-it-wrong-part-1 https://blogs.oracle.com/smartscan-deep-dive/when-bloggers-get-it-wrong-part-2). If you want to read something about the feature in general, search for the feature name, you’ll find several blogposts about it.

To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.
Syndicate content