linux

martin.bach's picture

12.2 New Feature: the FLEX ASM disk group part 2

In the first part of this series I explained the basics and some potential motivation behind the use of ASM Flex disk groups. In this part I would like to complete the description of new concepts.

New Concepts related to FLEX ASM Disk Groups

With the Flex disk group mounted, the next steps are to create a few new entities. First, I want to create a Quota Group. The Quota Group – as the name implies – will enforce quotas for entities residing within it. It is optional to add one yourself, Oracle creates a default Quota Group for you that does not enforce storage limits. As you will see later, the default Quota Group will be assigned to all new databases in the Flex ASM disk group.

fritshoogland's picture

Postgresql block internals, part 3

This is the third part in a series of blogposts about how postgresql manages data in its blocks (called ‘pages’ in postgres speak). If you found this post and did not read the previous ones, it might be beneficial to read block internals (part 1) and block internals, part 2 first. In these blogposts I’ve shown how heap and index pages look like, and how these can be investigated, including looking at the raw block information.

This blogpost is intended to show the effects on pages when DML happens. This is inherently different from my personal reference of database implementation, which is the oracle database.

martin.bach's picture

12.2 New Feature: the FLEX ASM disk group part 1

I knew about the 12.2 FLEX ASM disk group type from other presenters but until now – when researching the feature for the upcoming DOAG HA Day – I haven’t been able to appreciate how cool this is. And I really think it is pretty cool and worth sharing! There is a lot to be said about the feature and these tests, which is why I am splitting it into multiple parts.

Please be aware that this post is about my lab experiments, I have no production experience with FLEX ASM disk groups. As with all new features it might take a while to mature, so test, test, test…

fritshoogland's picture

Postgresql block internals, part 2

This is the second part of a blogpost about Postgresql database block internals. If you found this blogpost, and are interested in getting started with it, please read the first part, and then continue with this post.
I am doing the investigations on Oracle Linux 7u3 with postgres 9.6 (both the latest versions when this blogpost was written).

In the first part I talked about the pageinspect extension, and investigated the page header and line pointer array. This blogpost looks at the actual tuples, including the index, and how these are stored in the pages.

fritshoogland's picture

Postgresql block internals

This blogpost is the result of me looking into how postgres works, and specifically the database blocks. The inspiration and essence of this blogpost comes from two blogs from Jeremiah Peschka: https://facility9.com/2011/03/postgresql-row-storage-fundamentals/ and https://facility9.com/2011/04/postgresql-update-internals/
I am using Oracle Linux 7u3 and postgres 9.6 (current versions when this blogpost was written).

Postgres is already installed, and a database cluster is already running. Let’s create a database ‘test’ for the sake of our tests:

$ createdb test

Once the database is created, logging on is done with ‘psql’:

martin.bach's picture

12.2 new features: a first encounter with the new Cluster Health Advisor

One of the many new manuals that showed up in Oracle Database 12.2 is the Oracle Autonomous Health Framework User’s Guide. This book contains a lot of information, some of which we already know from previous releases, and some new stuff as well. One of the new chapters caught my eye in particular:

“Proactively Detecting and Diagnosing Performance Issues for Oracle RAC”

Said chapter 5 introduces a new feature, called the Cluster Health Advisor (CHA), that should help you understand the performance of your cluster better. Really? Time to start the VMs to create a test.

fritshoogland's picture

Ara: ansible run analysis

This is a short blogpost meant as both an introduction for those who don’t know Ara and a guide on how to install Ara.
Ara means ‘Ansible Runtime Analysis’, and is a tool for storing metadata that Ansible uses during execution. It is very valuable, because it takes a lot of guesswork and entering debug statements in your playbook away.

This is a guide on how to install Ara on Oracle Linux 7. I assume ansible is already installed. If want to start fresh, add EPEL and yum install ansible and git. That’s all you need to begin!

First, become root and install ara using a playbook:

fritshoogland's picture

How to install the semaphore UI for running ansible

This blogpost is about how to install the semaphore user-interface for running ansible. Ansible is an automation language for automating IT infrastructures. It consists of command-line executables (ansible, ansible-playbook for example) that can run a single task using a module (using the ansible executable), or can run multiple tasks using multiple modules in order to perform more complex setup requirements (using the ansible-playbook executable). The downside of running IT tasks via the command-line is that there is no logging by default, unless someone decides to save the standard out to a file, which, if multiple people start doing that by hand will probably lead to a huge collection of text files which are hard to navigate. Also, when tasks are run via a common place, it’s an all or nothing situation: everybody has access to all the scripts, or to nothing.

fritshoogland's picture

A performance deep dive into column encryption

Actually, this is a follow up post from my performance deep dive into tablespace encryption. After having investigated how tablespace encryption works, this blogpost is looking at the other encryption option, column encryption. A conclusion that can be shared upfront is that despite they basically perform the same function, the implementation and performance consequences are quite different.

fritshoogland's picture

A performance deep dive into tablespace encryption

This is a run through of a performance investigation into Oracle tablespace encryption. These are the versions this test was performed on:

$ cat /etc/oracle-release
Oracle Linux Server release 6.8
$ /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1/OPatch/opatch lspatches
24315824;Database PSU 12.1.0.2.161018, Oracle JavaVM Component (OCT2016)
24006101;Database Patch Set Update : 12.1.0.2.161018 (24006101)

In this test I created an encrypted tablespace:

SQL> create tablespace is_encrypted datafile size 10m autoextend on next 10m encryption default storage(encrypt);

(this assumes you have setup a master encryption key already)
And I created an encrypted simple heap table with one row:

Syndicate content