linux

fritshoogland's picture

Postgresql block internals, part 2

This is the second part of a blogpost about Postgresql database block internals. If you found this blogpost, and are interested in getting started with it, please read the first part, and then continue with this post.
I am doing the investigations on Oracle Linux 7u3 with postgres 9.6 (both the latest versions when this blogpost was written).

In the first part I talked about the pageinspect extension, and investigated the page header and line pointer array. This blogpost looks at the actual tuples, including the index, and how these are stored in the pages.

fritshoogland's picture

Postgresql block internals

This blogpost is the result of me looking into how postgres works, and specifically the database blocks. The inspiration and essence of this blogpost comes from two blogs from Jeremiah Peschka: https://facility9.com/2011/03/postgresql-row-storage-fundamentals/ and https://facility9.com/2011/04/postgresql-update-internals/
I am using Oracle Linux 7u3 and postgres 9.6 (current versions when this blogpost was written).

Postgres is already installed, and a database cluster is already running. Let’s create a database ‘test’ for the sake of our tests:

$ createdb test

Once the database is created, logging on is done with ‘psql’:

martin.bach's picture

12.2 new features: a first encounter with the new Cluster Health Advisor

One of the many new manuals that showed up in Oracle Database 12.2 is the Oracle Autonomous Health Framework User’s Guide. This book contains a lot of information, some of which we already know from previous releases, and some new stuff as well. One of the new chapters caught my eye in particular:

“Proactively Detecting and Diagnosing Performance Issues for Oracle RAC”

Said chapter 5 introduces a new feature, called the Cluster Health Advisor (CHA), that should help you understand the performance of your cluster better. Really? Time to start the VMs to create a test.

fritshoogland's picture

Ara: ansible run analysis

This is a short blogpost meant as both an introduction for those who don’t know Ara and a guide on how to install Ara.
Ara means ‘Ansible Runtime Analysis’, and is a tool for storing metadata that Ansible uses during execution. It is very valuable, because it takes a lot of guesswork and entering debug statements in your playbook away.

This is a guide on how to install Ara on Oracle Linux 7. I assume ansible is already installed. If want to start fresh, add EPEL and yum install ansible and git. That’s all you need to begin!

First, become root and install ara using a playbook:

fritshoogland's picture

How to install the semaphore UI for running ansible

This blogpost is about how to install the semaphore user-interface for running ansible. Ansible is an automation language for automating IT infrastructures. It consists of command-line executables (ansible, ansible-playbook for example) that can run a single task using a module (using the ansible executable), or can run multiple tasks using multiple modules in order to perform more complex setup requirements (using the ansible-playbook executable). The downside of running IT tasks via the command-line is that there is no logging by default, unless someone decides to save the standard out to a file, which, if multiple people start doing that by hand will probably lead to a huge collection of text files which are hard to navigate. Also, when tasks are run via a common place, it’s an all or nothing situation: everybody has access to all the scripts, or to nothing.

fritshoogland's picture

A performance deep dive into column encryption

Actually, this is a follow up post from my performance deep dive into tablespace encryption. After having investigated how tablespace encryption works, this blogpost is looking at the other encryption option, column encryption. A conclusion that can be shared upfront is that despite they basically perform the same function, the implementation and performance consequences are quite different.

fritshoogland's picture

A performance deep dive into tablespace encryption

This is a run through of a performance investigation into Oracle tablespace encryption. These are the versions this test was performed on:

$ cat /etc/oracle-release
Oracle Linux Server release 6.8
$ /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1/OPatch/opatch lspatches
24315824;Database PSU 12.1.0.2.161018, Oracle JavaVM Component (OCT2016)
24006101;Database Patch Set Update : 12.1.0.2.161018 (24006101)

In this test I created an encrypted tablespace:

SQL> create tablespace is_encrypted datafile size 10m autoextend on next 10m encryption default storage(encrypt);

(this assumes you have setup a master encryption key already)
And I created an encrypted simple heap table with one row:

martin.bach's picture

Using virt-install/KVM and kickstart to create lots of identical VMs quickly

In preparation for an upcoming talk about Oracle 12.2 I am planning on getting my feet wet with the Oracle 12.2 Sharding option. It seems to be a very interesting subject to get into, but like all new subjects, they can be intimidating at first due to their complexity. So why not use the instructions someone has already written down?

Oracle has a nice series of articles about Sharding. I found the Sharding landing page in the Maximum Availability Architecture section on OTN. For the purpose of this blog post I’m intending to follow the “Oracle Sharded Database Deployment with Active Data Guard using CREATE SHARD method for On-Premises – Cookbook”, available from the aforementioned landing page.

martin.bach's picture

Little things worth knowing: Executing RDA on RAC

Result! I have finally been able to gather a complete RDA (Oracle Remote Diagnostic Agent) output on my 2 node RAC system. After consulting the relevant documentation on MOS-which is spread over at least 42 Doc IDs-I found them not to be very helpful to the degree that some of what I read is actually wrong or contradicting. I put together a short note, primarily to myself, to remind me of the process. I hope you find it useful, too.

The RDA version I used for this post is 8.14.x from MOS March 4th 2017. My RAC nodes are based on Oracle Linux 7.3/UEK 4.

Starting the data collection

martin.bach's picture

New Events for Data Guard and Synchronous Redo Transport in 12c (2)

After the baseline has been established in the first part of this series it’s time to measure the effect of the network in this part. The second test will introduce an interesting feature: Using Linux’s own Traffic Shaper/Quality of Services module I will add a delay of 100ms to the Data Guard network interface card (NIC) to slow things down a little.

WARNING: this is of course a lab or VM-only situation. I can’t exert control over wire quality in my (own) switches, hence some software magic is needed on my virtual ones. This post is intended to be merely for educational purposes, not for use at work.

I am continuing to use the 2 node RAC 12.1.0.2.170117 primary database on Oracle Linux 7 with UEK 4 and an identical RAC to host my standby database.

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