linux

martin.bach's picture

Support for Pluggable Databases in Enterprise Manager

Currently there is an interesting thread on the oracle-l mailing list about OEM 12c support for database 12c Release. Unlike previous OEM generations this time OEM was not lagging behind. I am using OEM 12.1.0.2.0 with the database plugin 12.1.0.3.0 and yes, I can see PDBs!

pdbs-001

The above snapshot is from the database targets overview page. As you can see there is a Container Database (CDB1) and it has exactly 1 PDB. When you click on the CDB you get to the main page:

martin.bach's picture

DBMS_FILE_TRANSFER potentially cool but then it is not

This post is interesting for all those of you who plan to transfer data files between database instance. Why would you consider this? Here’s an excerpt from the official 12.1 package documentation:

The DBMS_FILE_TRANSFER package provides procedures to copy a binary file within a database or to transfer a binary file between databases.

But it gets better:

The destination database converts each block when it receives a file from a platform with different endianness. Datafiles can be imported after they are moved to the destination database as part of a transportable operation without RMAN conversion.

So that’s a way not only to copy data files from one database to another but it also allows me to get a file from SPARC and make it available on Linux!

martin.bach's picture

Creating a 12c Container Database from scripts

If you are curious how to create a CDB without the help of dbca then the “generate scripts” option is exactly the right approach! I am a great fan of creating databases with the required options only-the default template (General Purpose) is dangerous as it creates a database with options you may not be licensed for and additionally opens security risk.

The best^H^H^Heasiest way to understand how a Container Database (CDB from now on) is created is to let dbca create the scripts. The process is the same as with an interactive installation except that at the very end you do NOT create the database but tick the box to generate the scripts.

The resulting scripts will be created in $ORACLE_BASE/admin/${ORACLE_SID}/scripts. Change directory to this location and you will be surprised about the sheer number of files ending in *.sql

martin.bach's picture

Adding a node to a 12c RAC cluster

This post is not in chronological order, I probably should have written something about installing RAC 12c first. I didn’t want to write the tenth installation guide for Clusterware so I’m focusing on extending my two node cluster to three nodes to test the new Flex ASM feature. If you care about installing RAC 12c head over to RAC Attack for instructions, or Tim Hall’s site. The RAC Attack instructions are currently being worked at for a 12c upgrade, you can follow/participate the work on this free mailing list.

The cluster I installed is based on KVM on my lab server. I have used Oracle Linux 6.4 with UEK2 for the host OS. It is a standard, i.e. not a Flex Cluster but with Flex ASM configured. My network configuration is as shown:

oraclebase's picture

Fedora 19 : Upgrade from Fedora 18…

I finally got round to upgrading my desktop machine to Fedora 19. The experience was pretty similar to upgrade from Fedora 17 to Fedora 18.

This time I had to remove FireFox, as it was holding on to Fedora 18 packages. Once I removed and re-added it I could complete a “yum update”. Things seem to be OK.

The DropBox repository is lagging behind again…

I still think it’s better to do clean installations, but I don’t have time to do that now. Perhaps when I get back from South America I’ll do it properly.

Cheers

Tim…

 

 

glennfawcett's picture

Analyzing IO at the Exadata Cell level… iostat summary

While analyzing Write-Back cache activity on Exadata storage cells, I wanted something to interactively monitor IO while I was running various tests.  The problem is summarizing the results from ALL storage cell.  So, I decided to use my old friend “iostat” and a quick easy script to roll up the results for both DISK and FLASH.  This allowed me to monitor the IOPS, IO size, wait times, and service times.  

The “iostat-all.sh” tool shows the following data:

martin.bach's picture

Oracle Automatic Data Optimisation 12c

One of the seriously cool new features in the Oracle database 12c is the automated lifecycle management option. I freely admit you can get the same with other storage vendors (EMC FAST VP is the one I know first hand, but 3PAR and others have similar technology) but this is not really an option for the Oracle Database and Exadata. A quick word of warning: I have not even opened the licensing guide for 12c yet, this may well be a cost option so as always please ensure you are appropriately licensed before using this feature.

Why this post

The official documentation-VLDB and Partitioning Guide, chapter 5-is a bit lacking, as is the SQL Language Reference, hence this post.

martin.bach's picture

Flex ASM 12c in action

I have been working on Flex ASM for a little while and so far like the feature. In a nutshell Flex ASM removes the requirement to have one (and only one!) ASM instance per cluster node. Instead, you get three ASM instances, not more, not less-regardless of cluster size.

Databases which are in fact “ASM clients” as in v$asm_client connect remotely or locally, depending on the placement of the ASM instance and the database instance.

martin.bach's picture

DBA_USERS.ORACLE_MAINTAINED in 12c

Sometimes it’s the little differences that make something really cool, and I was wondering why this hasn’t made it into the Oracle dictionary before.

Have you ever asked yourself which out of the 30 or so accounts in the database were maintained by Oracle or in other words were Oracle internal and to be left alone? I did so on many occasions especially when it comes to the options I do not regularly see in the database. DBA_USERS lists all accounts in the database, user managed as well as Oracle managed. The below is the definition of the 11g view:

martin.bach's picture

Trying the playground repository with Oracle Linux

I’m always a great fan of trying new things and Oracle has made it a little easier a little while ago. In my early Linux days (SuSE Linux 6.0 was my first distribution, it was still kernel 2.0.36 but “2.2 ready”) compiling the kernel was more manageable than it is today. I even remember “make zImage” instead of the now default “make bzImage” and “make menuconfig” before that :) There was less complexity with hardware, and the initrd was more of a “nice to have” than a requirement with those PATA drives in my system.

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