linux

fritshoogland's picture

perf top ‘Too many events are opened.’ message

This is a small blogpost on using ‘perf’. I got an error message when I tried to run ‘perf top’ systemwide:

# perf top
Too many events are opened.
Try again after reducing the number of events

What actually is the case here, is actually described in the perf wiki:

Open file limits
The design of the perf_event kernel interface which is used by the perf tool, is such that it uses one file descriptor per event per-thread or per-cpu.
On a 16-way system, when you do:
perf stat -e cycles sleep 1
You are effectively creating 16 events, and thus consuming 16 file descriptors.

fritshoogland's picture

Oracle SGA memory allocation on startup

Recently I have been presenting on what running on a large intel based NUMA system looks like (OTN EMEA tour in Düsseldorf and Milan, and I will be presenting about this at the Dutch AMIS 25th anniversary event in june). The investigation of this presentation is done on a SGI UV 300 machine with 24 terabyte of memory, 32 sockets (=NUMA nodes), 480 core’s and 960 threads.

Recently I have been given access to a new version of the UV 300, the UV 300 RL, for which the CPU has improved from Ivy Bridge to Haswell, and now has 18 core’s per socket instead of 15, which means the number of core’s on a fully equipped system is 576, which makes 1152 threads.

martin.bach's picture

Experimenting with the ZFSSA’s snapshot capability using the simulator

Recently I have been asked how the Copy-on-Write cloning works on the ZFS Storage Appliance. More specifically, the question was about the “master” copy: did it have to be static or could it be rolled forward? What better than a test to work out how it works. Unfortunately I don’t have an actual system available to me at home so I had to revert to the simulator, hoping that it represents the real appliance accurately.

Setup

First I downloaded the ZFS Storage Appliance Simulator from the Oracle website and created a nice, new, shiny storage system (albeit virtual). Furthermore I have an Oracle Linux 7 system with UEK3 that will attach to the ZFSSA using dNFS. The appliance has an IP address of 192.168.56.101 while the Linux system is accessible via 192.168.56.20. This is of course a virtual toy environment, a real life setup would be quite different using IPMP and multiple paths preferably over Infiniband.

Configuration

martin.bach's picture

Trouble with multiple SCAN listeners in 12c Release 1

UPDATE 28-JUL-2016: the problem – as stated by Anil in the comments section – seems to be fixed. I applied the Proactive Bundle Patch 23273686 and OJVM patch 23177536 to the Grid and RDBMS home. After a successful execution of datapatch the errors in the CRSD agent log I reported in this post went away, and I can also see the settings in the database alert.log.

Scroll to the bottom of the post for more detail.

For those not yet on that patch level-the original post

tim.evdbt@gmail.com's picture

Presenting “UNIX/Linux Tools For The Oracle DBA” at #C16LV

Going back to the invention of the graphical user interface (GUI) in the 1970s, there has been tension between the advocates of the magical pointy-clickety GUI and the clickety-clackety command-line interface (CLI).

Part of it is stylistic… GUI’s are easier, faster, more productive.

Part of it is ego… CLI’s require more expertise and are endlessly customizable.

Given the evolutionary pressures on technology, the CLI should have gone extinct decades ago, as more and more expertise is packed into better and better GUI’s.  And in fact, that has largely happened, but the persistence of the CLI can be explained by four persistent justifications…

fritshoogland's picture

Oracle Linux 7 disks and udev

I was setting up disk devices for ASM in Oracle Linux 7. I knew things have changed between Oracle Linux 6 and Oracle Linux 7, but only just a little bit.

First of all, let’s take a look at the current disk usage. To see what disk devices are visible and how they are used, use lsblk:

fritshoogland's picture

The Oracle wait interface granularity of measurement

The intention of this blogpost is to show the Oracle wait time granularity and the Oracle database time measurement granularity. One of the reasons for doing this, is the Oracle database switched from using the function gettimeofday() up to version 11.2 to clock_gettime() to measure time.

This switch is understandable, as gettimeofday() is a best guess of the kernel of the wall clock time, while clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC,…) is an monotonic increasing timer, which means it is more precise and does not have the option to drift backward, which gettimeofday() can do in certain circumstances, like time adjustments via NTP.

The first thing I wanted to proof, is the switch of the gettimeofday() call to the clock_gettime() call. This turned out not to be as simple as I thought.

fritshoogland's picture

PL/SQL context switch, part 2

This is the second blogpost on using PL/SQL inside SQL. If you landed on this page and have not read the first part, click this link and read that first. I gotten some reactions on the first article, of which one was: how does this look like with ‘pragma udf’ in the function?

Pragma udf is a way to speed up using PL/SQL functions in (user defined function), starting from version 12. If you want to know more about the use of pragma udf, and when it does help, and when it doesn’t, please google for it.

create or replace function add_one( value number ) return number is
        pragma udf;
        l_value number(10):= value;
begin
        return l_value+1;
end;
/

select sum(add_one(id)) from t2;

As you can see, really the only thing you have to do is add ‘pragma udf’ in the declaration section of PL/SQL.

fritshoogland's picture

PL/SQL context switch

Whenever you use PL/SQL in SQL statements, the Oracle engine needs to switch from doing SQL to doing PL/SQL, and switch back after it is done. Generally, this is called a “context switch”. This is an example of that:

-- A function that uses PL/SQL 
create or replace function add_one( value number ) return number is
        l_value number(10):= value;
begin
        return l_value+1;
end;
/
-- A SQL statement that uses the PL/SQL function
select sum(add_one(id)) from t2;

Of course the functionality of the function is superfluous, it can easily be done in ‘pure’ SQL with ‘select sum(id+1) from t2’. But that is not the point.
Also, I added a sum() function, for the sake of preventing output to screen per row.

oraclebase's picture

Video: Oracle Linux Virtual Machine (VM) on Amazon Web Services (AWS)

Continuing the cloud theme, here is a quick run through of the process of creating an Oracle Linux virtual machine on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

A few months ago I wrote an article about installing an Oracle database on AWS.

I updated the images in that article last night to bring them in line with this video.

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