Oracle

oraclebase's picture

Oracle Midlands Event #5

Just a quick reminder. Oracle Midlands Event #5 is next Tuesday evening. Here is the information from the website.
om5

I’ll see you there!

Cheers

Tim…


Oracle Midlands Event #5 was first posted on September 10, 2014 at 9:48 am.
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Jonathan Lewis's picture

Quiz Night

I have a table with several indexes on it, and I have two versions of a query that I might run against that table. Examine them carefully, then come up with some plausible reason why it’s possible (with no intervening DDL, DML, stats collection, parameter fiddling etc., etc., etc.) for the second form of the query to be inherently more efficient than the first.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

ASSM Truncate.

Here’s one that started off with a tweet from Kevin Closson, heading towards a finish that shows some interesting effects when you truncate large objects that are using ASSM. To demonstrate the problem I’ve set up a tablespace using system allocation of extents and automatic segment space management (ASSM).  It’s the ASSM that causes the problem, but it requires a mixture of circumstances to create a little surprise.

fritshoogland's picture

Oracle IO wait events: db file sequential read

(the details are investigated and specific to Oracle’s database implementation on Linux x86_64)

Exadata IO: This event is not used with Exadata storage, ‘cell single block physical read’ is used instead.
Parameters:
p1: file#
p2: block#
p3: blocks

Despite p3 listing the number of blocks, I haven’t seen a db file sequential read event that read more than one block ever. Of course this could change in a newer release.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Group By Bug

This just in from OTN Database Forum – a surprising little bug with “group by elimination” exclusive to 12c.


alter session set nls_date_format='dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss';

select
       /* optimizer_features_enable('12.1.0.1')*/
       trunc (ts,'DD') ts1, sum(fieldb) fieldb
from (
  select
        ts, max(fieldb) fieldb
  from (
  select trunc(sysdate) - 1/24 ts, 1 fieldb from dual
  union all
  select trunc(sysdate) - 2/24 ts, 2 fieldb from dual
  union all
  select trunc(sysdate) - 3/24 ts, 3 fieldb from dual
  union all
  select trunc(sysdate) - 4/24 ts, 4 fieldb from dual
  union all
  select trunc(sysdate) - 5/24 ts, 5 fieldb from dual
  )
  group by ts
)
group by trunc (ts,'DD')
/

You might expect to get one row as the answer – but this is the result I got, with the execution plan pulled from memory:

dbakevlar's picture

EM12c and Windows OS Failover Cluster- Keep it Simple

This is going to be a “KISS”, (Keep it Simple, Silly) post.  I was offered a second Windows cluster to test on when my original one was required for QA.  It was a gracious offer, but I also found out why a cluster should be kept simple and this cluster was anything but simple.  Many times, issues are created and we’ll never see them coming until we go through the pain and the EM

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Order of Operation

One response to my series on reading execution plans was an email request asking me to clarify what I meant by the “order of operation” of the lines of an execution plan. Looking through the set of articles I’d written I realised that I hadn’t made any sort of formal declaration of what I meant, all I had was a passing reference in the introduction to part 4; so here’s the explanation.

 

By “order of operation” I mean the order in which the lines of an execution plan start to produce a rowsource. It’s worth stating this a little formally as any other interpretation could lead to confusion; consider the following simple hash join:

kevinclosson's picture

SLOB Patch. AWR Post-Processing Script (awr_info.sh) Fix.

BLOG UPDATE 2014.09.11: Please note: the following is a link to a more recent update of the awr_info.sh script. This version adds DB Time, DB CPU and Logical I/O: click here. The MD5 sum for this version of awr_info.sh is:  a28a38b11040bb94f08a8f817792c75c

The SLOB kit comes with a little script that extracts interesting information from the awr.txt file produced at the end of a SLOB test. This is just a quick blog entry to point folks to a patched version of awr_info.sh that works properly with all Oracle Database 11g releases as well as Oracle Database 12c.

Oracle changed AWR format in the 11.2.0.4 and 12c releases so the old awr_info.sh script (in the publicly available SLOB kit) has been faulty for some time now.

kevinclosson's picture

SLOB Failing To Generate AWR Reports? Red Hat Bug 919793!

This is a quick blog post to help folks that are testing with SLOB at high user (session) counts. The situation may arise where you are testing SLOB on a large configuration, with or without SQL*Net, and the SLOB driver (runit.sh) is failing to produce Automatic Workload Repository (a.k.a AWR) reports.

This problem will generally be seen on RHEL 6 variants that implement the much maligned /etc/security/limits.d/90-nproc.conf method of preventing fork bombs. For more information on this configuration file please refer to Red Hat bug 919793.

If you are not getting AWR reports under the condition I describe then the problem is most likely due to 90-nproc.conf short circuiting the ulimit(3) tuning you’ve established.

kevinclosson's picture

XtremIO @ Tech Field Day 2014

kevinclosson:

As scientists, interested in what’s happening in platform technology, readers of my blog will find my colleague Itzik Reich’s recent blog on EMC XtremIO to be very informative. Enjoy!

Originally posted on Itzikr's Blog:

image

Hi,

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