pete.sharman's picture

OOW2015 Database Manageability

This posting covers the Database Manageability sessions at OOW2015. Note that these are database manageability via Enterprise Manager, as opposed to sessions specifically covering database features and functions. The following sessions fall under this category:

pete.sharman's picture

OOW2015 Private Cloud and DBLM

Yesterday I posted an entry on what was coming with OOW2015, specifically discussing the Oracle Management Cloud sessions. This post is similar but looking at one of the more “traditional” EM areas that my team is responsible for – Private Cloud and DBLM. The sessions that are of most interest here are:

Jonathan Lewis's picture


Here’s a little note that I drafted (according to its date stamp) in January 2013 and then forgot to post. (Which adds a little irony to the title.)


Here’s an object lesson in (a) looking at what’s in front of you, and (b) how hard it is to remember all the details.

I ran a script today [ED: i.e. some time early Jan 2013] that I’ve have no problems with in earlier versions of Oracle, but today I was running it against for the first time, and hit a problem with autotrace:

Kerry Osborne's picture

Controlling Execution Plans Workshop

I did a workshop at ECO 2015 today. It was a lot of fun. I’ve done numerous presentations on SQL Profiles, SQL Patches and Baselines in the past, but this session was a no-slides, hands on demo of some of the scripts I use. I also showed some scripts that can be used to re-write SQL on the fly using a new feature of 12c called SQL Translation Framework. Here is a zip file that contains all the scripts and the Controlling Executions Plans presentation that I mentioned during the workshop.

Controlling Execution Plans Workshop Zip File

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pete.sharman's picture

OOW2015 is almost here!

Hard as it is to believe, yet again it is time for the biggest Oracle conference on the planet (or any other planet for that matter!) Yes, OOW2015 is just around the corner! Unfortunately I won’t be there this year, as I have my eldest daughter’s wedding shortly after it, but nevertheless having seen what’s coming up from the Enterprise Manager side of the house, there are a few sessions I can certainly recommend.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Result Cache

Yesterday I thought I’d spend half an hour before breakfast creating a little demonstration of a feature; some time about midnight I felt it was time to stop because I’d spent enough time chasing around a couple of bugs that produced wrong results in a variety of ways. Today’s short post is just little warning: be VERY careful what you do with the PL/SQL result cache – if you use the results of database queries in the cache you may end up with inconsistent results in your application. Here’s one very simple example of what can go wrong, starting with a little script:

tanelpoder's picture

RAM is the new disk – and how to measure its performance – Part 2 – Tools

In the previous article I explained that the main requirement for high-speed in-memory data scanning is column-oriented storage format for in-memory data. SIMD instruction processing is just icing on the cake. Let’s dig deeper. This is a long post, you’ve been warned.

Test Environment

I will cover full test results in the next article in this series. First, let’s look into the test setup, environment and what tools I used for peeking inside CPU hardware.

I was running the tests on a relatively old machine with 2 CPU sockets, with 6-core CPUs in each socket (2s12c24t):

oraclebase's picture

Oracle 12c RAC on Oracle Linux 7 using VirtualBox

virtualbox I’m a little late to the party here, but I’ve finally got round to updating the VirtualBox 12c RAC article for Oracle Linux 7.

It’s not hard to do these VirtualBox RAC installations, but I find the process of putting the articles together really tedious. There are so many screenshots. That’s why it’s taken a while to build up the motivation to do it. :)

oraclebase's picture

SANGAM15 – See you there!

I mentioned my Oracle OpenWorld 2015 trip in a previous post. Yesterday evening I picked up my passport with my lovely new India visa in it!

The talks are written. The flights are booked. The hotel is booked. I have a visa. So that’s me sorted for SANGAM15 in November! :)

pete.sharman's picture

BI Publisher Tips and Techniques

A colleague of mine asked recently if we had any best practices for BI Publisher, the latest and greatest reporting tool we use within Enterprise Manager (the old tool, Information Publisher, is of course also still supported but this post is relevant to BI Publisher). As you would well know if you’ve been following my posts or heard me presenting at conferences, best practices is a term I hate, so rather than using that term let’s discuss some tips and techniques that might be relevant to you when using BI Publisher.

Tip #1: Allocate Extra Memory

The amount of required memory for BI Publisher depends on a huge number of factors – complexity of reports, size of datasets being returned, BI Publisher scheduling load, etc. We recommend adding at least 1.5 Gb of RAM for the OMS machine, but you may need as much as 4-5 Gb depending on the factors just mentioned.

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