Oracle

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Assumptions

Over the last few days I’ve been tweeting little extracts from Practical Oracle 8i, and one of the tweets contained the following quote:

This lead to the question:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

DB links

A recent thread on the ODC SQL & PL/SQL forum raised the question of how data moves across a database link – is it row by row or array based (or other)? It’s a good question as it’s fairly common knowledge that distributed queries can be very much slower than the same query when executed on an equivalent set of local tables, so it’s worth having a little poke around to see if there’s anything in the way the data moves across the link that could be tweaked to improve performance.

dbakevlar's picture

Power BI Reporting with Oracle Essbase

This last week, I presented a few sessions at ODTUG’s KSCOPE 2019 conference in Seattle.  One of these sessions was with my wonderful co-presenter and Oracle Application Cloud expert, Opal Alapat.  I connected with her when the call for papers opened and asked her if there would be interest in doing a session with Power BI connect to the Essbase in the Oracle Applications cloud, (OAC).  There was no desire to do a bake-off or competitive session, just a morbid curiosity about what options there were to connect the two and the outcome of building reports out of valuable data with such a powerful BI tool.

Franck Pachot's picture

Oracle Refresh Group consistency with nested materialized views.

A Refresh Group can be used to refresh a list of materialized views and ensures that all data is read with transaction consistency. This post is about the meaning of consistency when one materialized view depends on the other one. That’s just a quick test to understand the behavior. Any comment is welcome (preferably on twitter — @FranckPachot)

Documentation

The documentation mentions:

To preserve referential integrity and transactional (read) consistency among multiple materialized views, Oracle Database can refresh individual materialized views as part of a refresh group. After refreshing all of the materialized views in a refresh group, the data of all materialized views in the group correspond to the same transactionally consistent point in time.

Materialized View Concepts and Architecture

Jonathan Lewis's picture

opt_estimate 4

In the previous article in this series on the opt_estimate() hint I mentioned the “query_block” option for the hint. If you can identify a specify query block that becomes an “outline_leaf” in an execution plan (perhaps because you’ve deliberately given an query block name to an inline subquery and applied the no_merge() hint to it) then you can use the opt_estimate() hint to tell the optimizer how many rows will be produced by that query block (each time it starts). The syntax of the hint is very simple:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

opt_estimate 3

This is just a quick note to throw out a couple of of the lesser-known options for the opt_estimate() hint – and they may be variants that are likely to be most useful since they address a problem where the optimizer can produce consistently bad cardinality estimates. The first is the “group by” option – a hint that I once would have called a “strategic” hint but which more properly ought to be called a “query block” hint. Here’s the simplest possible example (tested under 12.2, 18.3 and 19.2):

Franck Pachot's picture

Oracle Materialized View Refresh Group atomicity— How to prove transactional consistency with…

Oracle Materialized View Refresh Group atomicity— How to prove transactional consistency with LogMiner

I had recently to prove to myself, and then to the Oracle Support, that a Materialized View Group was not refreshed atomically as it should, according to the documentation:

Add materialized views to a refresh group to ensure transactional consistency between the related materialized views in the refresh group. When a refresh group is refreshed, all materialized views that are added to a particular refresh group are refreshed at the same time.

Database Administrator's Guide

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Glitches

Here’s a question just in from Oracle-L that demonstrates the pain of assuming things work consistently when sometimes Oracle development hasn’t quite finished a bug fix or enhancement. Here’s the problem – which starts from the “scott.emp” table (which I’m not going to create in the code below):

Jonathan Lewis's picture

opt_estimate 2

This is a note that was supposed to be a follow-up to an initial example of using the opt_estimate() hint to manipulate the optimizer’s statistical understanding of how much data it would access and (implicitly) how much difference that would make to the resource usage. Instead, two years later, here’s part two – on using opt_estimate() with nested loop joins. As usual I’ll start with a little data set:

Franck Pachot's picture

Oracle ATP: MEDIUM and HIGH services are not for OLTP

The Autonomous Transaction Processing services HIGH and MEDIUM are forcing Parallel DML, which can lock the tables in eXclusive mode.

This may seem obvious that the TP and TPURGENT are for OLTP. But when you know that the service names are associated with Resource Manager consumer groups, you may think that high priority use cases should run on the HIGH service. However those LOW, MEDIUM, HIGH services were probably named when ADW was the only Autonomous Database and it is not directly obvious that they are there for reporting only, or maybe for some batch operations.

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