Oracle

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Ignoring Hints

One of the small changes (and, potentially big but temporary, threats) in 18.3 is the status of the “ignore hints” parameter. It ceases to be a hidden (underscore) parameter so you can now officially set parameter optimizer_ignore_hints to true in the parameter file, or at the system level, or at the session level. The threat, of course, it that some of your code may use the hidden version of the parameter (perhaps in an SQL_Patch as an opt_param() option rather than in its hint form) which no longer works after the upgrade.

Franck Pachot's picture

When Oracle Statistic Gathering times out.

When Oracle Statistic Gathering times out — I

This first part is about running manually, killing the job, and locking the stats

In a previous post, I explained how to see where the Auto Stats job has been running and timed out:

SYS.STATS_TARGET$

I got a case where it always timed out at the end of the standard maintenance window. One table takes many hours, longer than the largest maintenance window, it will always be killed at the end. And, because it stayed stale, and staler each day, this table was always listed first by the Auto Stat job. And many tables never got their chance to get their stats gathered for … years.

In that case, the priority is to gather statistics. That can be long. Then I run the job manually:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Timestamp Oddity

[Editorial note: this is something I started writing in 2013, managed to complete in 2017, and still failed to publish. It should have been a follow-on to another posting on the oddities of timestamp manipulation.]

Just as national language support used to be, timestamps and time-related columns are still a bit of a puzzle to the Oracle world – so much so that OEM could cripple a system if it was allowed to do the check for “failed logins over the last 30 minutes”. And, just like NLS, it’s one of those things that you use so rarely that you keep forgetting what went wrong the last time you used it. Here’s one little oddity that I reminded myself about recently:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Re-partitioning 2

Last week I wrote a note about turning a range-partitioned table into a range/list composite partitioned table using features included in 12.2 of Oracle. But my example was really just an outline of the method and bypassed a number of the little extra problems you’re likely to see in a real-world system, so in this note I’m going to bring in an issue that you might run into – and which I’ve seen appearing a number of times: ORA-14097: column type or size mismatch in ALTER TABLE EXCHANGE PARTITION.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Re-partitioning – 18

In yesterday’s note on the options for converting a range-partioned table into a composite range/list parititioned table I mentioned that you could do this online with a single command in 18c, so here’s some demonstration code to demonstrate that claim:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Re-partitioning

I wrote a short note a little while ago demonstrating how flexible Oracle 12.2 can be about physically rebuilding a table online to introduce or change the partitioning while discarding data, and so on.  But what do you do (as a recent question on ODC asked) if you want to upgrade a customer’s database to meet the requirements of a new release of your application by changing a partitioned table into a composite partitioned table and don’t have enough room to do an online rebuild. Which could require two copies of the data to exist at the same time.)

If you’ve got the down time (and not necessarily a lot is needed) you can fall back on “traditional methods” with some 12c enhancements. Let’s start with a range partitioned table:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Danger – Hints

It shouldn’t be possible to get the wrong results by using a hint – but hints are dangerous and the threat may be there if you don’t know exactly what a hint is supposed to do (and don’t check very carefully what has happened when you’ve used one that you’re not familiar with).

This post was inspired by a blog note from Connor McDonald titled “Being Generous to the Optimizer”. In his note Connor gives an example where the use of “flexible” SQL results in an execution plan that is always expensive to run when a more complex version of the query could produce a “conditional” plan which could be efficient some of the time and would be expensive only when there was no alternative. In his example he rewrote the first query below to produce the second query:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Misleading Execution Plan

A couple of weeks ago I published a note about an execution plan which showed the details of a scalar subquery in the wrong place (as far as the typical strategies for interpreting execution plans are concerned). In a footnote to the article I commented that Andy Sayer had produced a simple reproducible example of the anomaly based around the key features of the query supplied in the original posting and had emailed it to me.  With his permission (and with some minor modifications) I’ve reproduced it below:

Franck Pachot's picture

Generate your Oracle Secure External Password Store wallet from your tnsnames.ora

Want to connect passwordless with SQLcl to your databases from a single location? Here is a script that creates the Secure External Password Store wallet credentials for each service declared in the tnsnames, as well as shell aliases for it (as bash does autocompletion). The idea is to put everything (wallet, sqlcl,…) in one single directory that you must protect of course because read access to the files is sufficient to connect to your databases.

Download the latest SQLcl from:

SQLcl Downloads

And install the Oracle Client if you do not have it already:

Oracle Instant Client Downloads

Now here is my script that:

martin.bach's picture

Using the Secure External Password store with sqlcl

Sometimes it is necessary to invoke a SQL script in bash or otherwise in an unattended way. SQLcl has become my tool of choice because it’s really lightweight and can do a lot. If you haven’t worked with it yet, you really should give it a go.

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