Oracle

Franck Pachot's picture

(DESCRIPTION_LIST=(DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS_LIST=(FAILOVER=YES)(LOAD_BALANCE=NO)

Do you have complex connection strings with DESCRIPTION_LIST, DESCRIPTION, ADDRESS_LIST, ADDRESS and a nice combination of FAILOVER and LOAD_BALANCE? You probably checked the documentation, telling you that FAILOVER=YES is the default at all levels, but LOAD_BALANCE=YES is the default only for DESCRIPTION_LIST. But when disaster recovery and availability is concerned, the documentation is not sufficient. I want to test it. And here is how I do it.

I don’t want to test it with the real configuration and stop the different instances. And I don’t need to. My way to test an address list is to define a tnsnames.ora with the connection string, such as the following:

Franck Pachot's picture

Full page logging in Postgres and Oracle

In my opinion, the volume of logging (aka redo log, aka xlog, aka WAL) is the most important factor for OLTP performance, availability and scalability, for several reasons:

  • This is the only structure where disk latency is a mandatory component of response time
  • This is a big part of the total volume of backups
  • This is sequential by nature, and very difficult to scale by parallelizing

In this post, I look at the volume of logging generated by some DML in Postgres and Oracle. I know Oracle quite well and just start to look at Postgres. The comparison here is not a contest but a way to better understand. For example, the default behavior of Postgres, with full_page_writes=on, is very similar to Oracle ‘begin backup’ mode. The comparison makes no sense for most of Postgres DBAs, but probably helps Oracle DBAs to understand it.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Join Factorization

This item is, by a roundabout route, a follow-up to yesterday’s note on a critical difference in cardinality estimates that appeared if you used the coalesce() function in its simplest form as a substitute for the nvl() function. Connor McDonald wrote a followup note about how using the nvl() function in a suitable predicate could lead to Oracle splitting a query into a UNION ALL (in version 12.2), which led me to go back to a note I’d written on the same topic about 10 years earlier where the precursor of this feature already existed but used CONCATENATION instead of OR-EXPANSION.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Coalesce v. NVL

“Modern” SQL should use the coalesce() function rather than the nvl() function – or so the story goes – but do you always want to do that to an Oracle database ? The answer is “maybe not”. Although the coalesce() function can emulate the nvl() function (in many cases) there are significant differences in behaviour, some that suggest it’s a good idea to use the substitution and others that suggest otherwise. Different decisions may be appropriate for different circumstances, and this note highlights one case against the substitution. We’ll start with a simple data set:

Franck Pachot's picture

V$MYSTAT delta values

Here is a little script I use from time to time to look at V$MYSTAT values and displaying on one line a set of statistics with their delta value between two calls.

The first script, _mystat_init.sql, initializes the variables. The second one displays the values, such as:

SQL> @ _mystat_diff.sql
 
db block changes redo size undo change vector size redo entries
---------------- ---------------- ----------------------- ----------------
57,371 15,445,852 6,111,608 37,709

fritshoogland's picture

A look into Oracle redo, part 3: log writer work cycle overview

This is the third part of a series of blogposts on how the Oracle database handles redo. The previous part talked about the memory area that stores redo strand information: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/05/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-2-the-discovery-of-the-kcrfa-structure/.

The single most important process in the Oracle database for handling redo is the log writer, which primary task is flushing the redo information other Oracle database processes put in the public redo strands to disk. Now that we have investigated the public redo strands and concurrency (first part) and kcrfsg_ and the KCRFA structure (second part), it seems logical to me to look at the log writer.

Franck Pachot's picture

Server process name in Postgres and Oracle

Every database analysis should start with system load analysis. If the host is in CPU starvation, then looking at other statistics can be pointless. With ‘top’ on Linux, or equivalent such as process explorer on Windows, you see the process (and threads). If the name of the process is meaningful, you already have a clue about the active sessions. Postgres goes further by showing the operation (which SQL command), the state (running or waiting), and the identification of the client.

Postgres

By default ‘top’ displays the program name (like ‘comm’ in /proc or in ‘ps’ format), which will be ‘postgres’ for all PostgreSQL processes. But you can also display the command line with ‘c’ in interactive mode, or directly starting with ‘top -c’, which is the same as the /proc/$pid/cmdline or ‘cmd’ or ‘args’ in ‘ps’ format.

pete.sharman's picture

Post GI / RDBMS Installation Configuration Steps

Introduction

This is the third article in a series of blog posts on building a test environment to closely match a Production environment so we could then upgrade the test environment from Oracle Database 12.1 to Oracle Database 12.2. In the first post, I covered performing a silent installation of the grid infrastructure software. In the second post, I followed that by performing a similar silent installation of the RDBMS software. In this post, I’ll be covering the rest of the configuration work for this environment.

pete.sharman's picture

Silent Installation of the RDBMS

Introduction

In my last post, I walked you through the silent installation of the Grid Infrastructure software. In this post, we’re moving on to the next stage of the environment build for this customer, doing a silent installation of the RDBMS software.

RDBMS Installation

The silent installation of the RDBMS software is fairly similar to that of the Grid Infrastructure software. You create a response file that contains the responses you would normally provide interactively, and use that with the runInstaller program to perform the installation. The response file I used for that is as follows:

pete.sharman's picture

Silent Installation of Grid Infrastructure

Introduction

Recently I had a requirement to install the Grid Infrastructure and Oracle RDBMS on a completely new VM. The customer I was doing this work for wanted to take a copy of their Production environment to another server so they could test an upgrade of their existing environment from Oracle GI / RDBMS 12.1 to 12.2. So they built a VM for me, copied the 12.1 installation media for both GI and the RDBMS and said “Go for it!”

I decided to log everything I did and write a series of blog posts based on my experience, in case it was of use to others. There were a few issues I needed to deal with for this customer. Some of those issues were:

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