Oracle

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Index Bouncy Scan 4

There’s always another hurdle to overcome. After I’d finished writing up the “index bouncy scan” as an efficient probing mechanism to find the combinations of the first two columns (both declared not null) of a very large index a follow-up question appeared almost immediately: “what if it’s a partitioned index”.

pete.sharman's picture

Why You Should Periodically Review Your Backups

Introduction

So like every good Oracle DBA, you’ve created a few databases, decided that if they were worth creating and using they might also be worth backing up, and created some backup scripts that do ample logging. All hunky dory, right? You shouldn’t need to revisit this, right?

WRONG!!!

pete.sharman's picture

Why You Should Periodically Review Your Backups

Introduction

So like every good Oracle DBA, you’ve created a few databases, decided that if they were worth creating and using they might also be worth backing up, and created some backup scripts that do ample logging. All hunky dory, right? You shouldn’t need to revisit this, right?

WRONG!!!

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Min/Max upgrade

Here’s a nice little optimizer enhancement that appeared in 12.2 to make min/max range scans (and full scans) available in more circumstances. Rather than talk through it, here’s a little demonstration:

Franck Pachot's picture

OpenShift on my Windows 10 laptop with MiniShift

If you want to play with OpenShift on your laptop, you can, in a Virtual Machine. I have VirtualBox installed on my laptop. I’ll install Minishift here, which will create the VM to run OpenShift with few simple commands only. On Linux you can refer to Daniel’s post. Here is the Windows version. Oh, and Daniel did that to run Postgres but my goal is to run an Oracle container of course. Or MySQL maybe.

I’ve downloaded minishift-1.18.0-windows-amd64.zip and unzipped it in D:\Downloads\minishift-1.18.0-windows-amd64 where I have minishift.exe

Minishift

I configure to use VirtualBox

minishift config set vm-driver virtualbox

fritshoogland's picture

Oracle database wait event ‘db file async I/O submit’ timing bug

This blogpost is a look into a bug in the wait interface that has been reported by me to Oracle a few times. I verified all versions from Oracle 11.2 version up to 18.2.0.0.180417 on Linux x86_64, in all these versions this bug is present. The bug is that the wait event ‘db file async I/O submit’ does not time anything when using ASM, only when using a filesystem, where this wait event essentially times the time the system call io_submit takes. All tests are done on Linux x86_64, Oracle Linux 7.4 with database and grid version 18.2.0.0.180417

So what?
You might have not seen this wait event before; that’s perfectly possible, because this wait event is unique to the database writer. So does this wait event matter?

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Index Bouncy Scan 3

This is a follow-up to a problem I had with yesterday’s example of using recursive CTEs to “bounce” along a multi-column index to pick out the unique set of combinations of the first two columns. Part of the resulting query used a pair of aggregate scalar subqueries in a select list – and Andrew Sayer improved on my query by introducing a “cross apply” (which I simply hadn’t thought of) which the optimizer transformed into a lateral view (which I had thought of, but couldn’t get to work).

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Upgrades

One of my maxims for Oracle performance is: “Don’t try to be too clever”. Apart from the obvious reason that no-one else may be able to understand how to modify your code if the requirements change at a future date, there’s always the possibility that an Oracle upgrade will mean some clever trick you implemented will simply stop working.

While searching for information about a possible Oracle bug recently I noticed the following fix control (v$system_fix_control) in 12.2.0.1:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Index Bouncy Scan 2

I wrote a note some time last year about taking advantage of the “index range scan (min/max)” operation in a PL/SQL loop to find the small number distinct values in a large single column index efficiently (for example an index that was not very efficient but existed to avoid the “foreign key locking” problem. The resulting comments included pointers to other articles that showed pure SQL solutions to the same problem using recursive CTEs (“with” subqueries) from Markus Winand and Sayan Malakshinov: both writers also show examples of extending the technique to cover more cases than the simple list of distinct values.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Filtering LOBs

A two-part question about the FILTER operation appeared on the Oracle-L list server a couple of days ago. The first part was a fairly common question – one that’s often prompted by the way the optimizer used to behave in older versions of Oracle. Paraphrased, it was: “Why is the total cost of the query so high compared to the sum of its parts?”

Here’s the query, and the execution plan.

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