Parallel Execution

randolf.geist's picture

New Parallel Distribution Method For Direct Path Loads

Starting with version 12c Oracle obviously has introduced another parallel distribution method for direct path loads (applicable to INSERT APPEND and CTAS operations) when dealing with partitioned objects.

As you might already know, starting with version 11.2 Oracle supported a new variation of the PQ_DISTRIBUTE hint allowing more control how data gets distributed for the actual DML load step. In addition to the already documented methods (NONE, RANDOM / RANDOM_LOCAL, PARTITION) there is a new one EQUIPART which obviously only applies to scenarios where both, source and target table are equi partitioned.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Interval Partition(s)

A quirky little feature of interval partitioning showed up on Twitter today – a parallel insert that would only use a single PX slave to do the inserting. With 1.1 billion rows and the option for running parallel 32 this made the loading process rather slower than it ought to have been.

Fortunately it’s quite easy to model (and work around) the oddity. So here’s a small data set and an empty partitioned table to work with:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Parallel Fun – 2

I started writing this note in March 2015 with the following introductory comment:

A little while ago I wrote a few notes about a very resource-intensive parallel query. One of the points I made about it was that it was easy to model, and then interesting to run on later versions of Oracle. So today I’m going to treat you to a few of the observations and notes I made after modelling the problem; and here’s the SQL to create the underlying objects:

randolf.geist's picture

Chinar Aliyev's Blog

Chinar Aliyev has recently started to pick up on several of my blog posts regarding Parallel Execution and the corresponding new features introduced in Oracle 12c.

It is good to see that obviously Oracle has since then improved some of these and added new ones as well.

Here are some links to the corresponding posts:

New automatic Parallel Outer Join Null Handling in 18c

Improvements regarding automatic parallel distribution skew handling in 18c

Chinar has also put some more thoughts on the HASH JOIN BUFFERED operation:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Hash Optimisation-

Franck Pachot did an interesting presentation at the OBUG (Belgium user group) Tech Days showing how to use one of the O/S debug/trace tools to step through the function calls that Oracle made during different types of joins. This prompted me to ask him a question about a possible optimisation of hash joins as follows:

The hash join operation creates an in-memory hash table from the rowsource produced by its first child operation then probes the hash table with rows from the row source produced by the second child operation; but if there are no rows in the first row source then there’s no need to acquire rows from the second row source, so Oracle doesn’t call the second child operation.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

DML Tablescans

This note is a follow-up to a recent comment a blog note about Row Migration:

So I wonder what is the difference between the two, parallel dml and serial dml with parallel scan, which makes them behave differently while working with migrated rows. Why might the strategy of serial dml with parallel scan case not work in parallel dml case? I am going to make a service request to get some clarifications but maybe I miss something obvious?

The comment also referenced a couple of MoS notes:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

QC vs. PX

One last post before closing down for the Christmas break.

Here’s a little puzzle with a remarkably easy and obvious solution that Ivica Arsov presented at the UKOUG Tech2018 conference. It’s a brilliant little puzzle that makes a very important point, because it reminded me that most problems are easy and obvious only after you’ve seen them at least once. If you’ve done a load of testing and investigation into something it’s easy to forget that there may be many scenarios you haven’t even thought of testing – so when you see the next puzzle your mind follows all the things you’ve done previously and doesn’t think that you might be looking at something new.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

I don’t know (yet)

Here’s a question that came to mind while reading a recent question on the OTN database forum. It’s a question to which I don’t know the answer and, at present, I don’t really want to bother modelling at present – although if I were on a customer site and this looked like a likely explanation for a performance anomaly it’s the sort of thing I would create a model for.

randolf.geist's picture

Oracle Parallel Execution Deep Dive Session

Here is a recording available on Youtube of a session I did a while ago, covering how to understand the essentials of Oracle Parallel Execution and how to read the corresponding execution plans.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Parallel_index hint

Prompted by a recent OTN posting I’ve dug out from my library the following demonstration of an anomalty with the parallel_index() hint. This note is a warning about  how little we understand hints and what they’re supposed to mean, and how we can be caught out by an upgrade. We’ll start with a data set which, to match a comment made in the origina posting rather than being a necessity for the demonstration, has an index that I’ve manipulated to be larger than the underlying table:

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