Performance tuning

rshamsud's picture

Scripts to create AWR reports quickly.

It is easier to create one or two AWR reports quickly using OEM. But, what if you have to create AWR reports for many snapshots? For example, your Oracle support analyst wants you to supply 10 1-hour AWR reports from 10AM to 8PM in a 8 node cluster? That’s about 80 AWR reports to create! Okay, okay, I may(!) be overselling it, but you get the point. It is useful to have a script to create AWR report for all instances for a given range of snapshot IDs. Following scripts are handy:

rshamsud's picture

RAC Internals: cached sequences and 12c


I blogged about DFS lock handle contention in an earlier blog entry. SV resources in Global Resource Directory (GRD) is used to maintain the cached sequence values. I will further probe the internal mechanics involved in the cached sequences. I will also discuss minor changes in the resource names to support pluggable databases (version 12c).

SV resources

Let’s create an ordered sequence in rs schema and then query values from the sequence few times.

create sequence rs.test_seq order cache 100;
select rs.test_seq.nextval from dual; -- repeated a few times.

Sequence values are permanently stored in the seq$ dictionary table. Cached sequence values are maintained in SV resources in GRD and SV resource names follows the naming convention to include object_id of the sequence. I will generate a string using a small helper script and we will use that resource name to search in the GRD.

rshamsud's picture

Book: Expert Oracle RAC 12c

A quick note, Expert Oracle RAC book co-written by me is available now: Expert Oracle RAC 12c. I have written about 6 chapters covering the RAC internals that you may want to learn :) I even managed to discuss the network internals in deep, after all, network is one of the most important component of a RAC cluster.

rshamsud's picture

Dude, where is my redo?

This blog entry is to discuss a method to identify the objects inducing higher amount of redo. First,we will establish that redo size increased sharply and then identify the objects generating more redo. Unfortunately, redo size is not tracked at a segment level. However, you can make an educated guess using ‘db block changes’ statistics. But, you must use logminer utility to identify the objects generating more redo scientifically.

Detecting redo size increase

AWR tables (require Diagnostics license) can be accessed to identify the redo size increase. Following query spools the daily rate of redo size. You can easily open the output file redosize.lst in an Excel spreadsheet and graph the data to visualize the redo size change. Use pipe symbol as the delimiter while opening the file in excel spreadsheet.

randolf.geist's picture

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Tool - Video Tutorial

A new major release (version 3.0) of my XPLAN_ASH tool is available for download.

You can download the latest version here.

In addition to many changes to the way the information is presented and many other smaller changes to functionality there is one major new feature: XPLAN_ASH now also supports S-ASH, the free ASH implementation.

If you run XPLAN_ASH in a S-ASH repository owner schema, it will automatically detect that and adjust accordingly.

XPLAN_ASH was tested against the latest stable version of S-ASH (2.3). There are some minor changes required to that S-ASH release in order to function properly with XPLAN_ASH. Most of them will be included in the next S-ASH release as they really are only minor and don't influence the general S-ASH functionality at all.

randolf.geist's picture

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A new version 2.0 of the XPLAN_ASH utility introduced here is available for download.You can download the latest version here.The change log tracks the following changes:- Access check- Conditional compilation for different database versions- Additional activity summary- Concurrent activity information (what is/was going on at the same time)- Experimental stuff: Additional I/O summary- More pretty printing- Experimental stuff: I/O added to Average Active Session Graph (renamed to Activity Timeline)- Top Execution Plan Lines and Top Activities added to Activity Timeline- Activity Timeline is now also shown for serial execution when TIMELINE option is specified- From on: We get the ACTUAL DOP from the undocumented PX_FLAGS colu

rshamsud's picture

DOUG presentation on dbms_xplan

Please join us at the DOUG (DALLAS ORACLE USERS GROUP) Oracle Database Forum meeting on Thursday, October 25, 2012 from 5 pm – 7 pm.
Presented by Riyaj Shamsudeen, OraInternals, & Sahil Thapar:

“Out with the old way, Enter dbms_xplan: A Swiss army knife for performance engineers”

Rough outline:
(i) Ability to query access path from memory, AWR repository
(ii) Ability to use cardinality feedback method to understand access plan issues. Few tips from a real world experience will be provided too.
(iii) Ability to understand issues with database links etc.
(iv) Options such as ADVANCED, ALLSTATS etc
(v) Why should you choose dbmx_xplan over tkprof+sql_trace combination?
(vi) Disadvantages of dbms_xplan and a quick introduction to dbms_monitor.

Refreshments sponsored by me :)

alberto.dellera's picture

Xplan: now with “self” measures for row source operations

One of the most useful information that the Oracle kernel attaches to plans in the library cache are measures of various resource consumption figures, such as elapsed time, consistent and current gets, disk reads, etcetera. These can be made available for each plan line (aka "row source operation").

These figures are always cumulative, that is, include both the resource consumed by the line itself and all of its progeny. It is very often extremely useful to exclude the progeny from the measure, to get what we could name the "self" figure (following, of course, the terminology introduced by Cary Millsap and Jeff Holt in their famous book Optimizing Oracle Performance).

rshamsud's picture

Open World 2012 – My Sunday presentation on truss, pstack etc.

Just a quick note, I will be presenting on “Truss, pstack, pmap, and more” talking about advanced UNIX utilities and how it can be utilized to understand inner working of an application or even Oracle Database Engine.

My timeslot is between 2:15 and 3:15 in Room 2016.

Uploading presentation files. Thanks for attending at OOW12.

randolf.geist's picture

Parallel Execution Analysis Using ASH - The XPLAN_ASH Tool


Note: This blog post actually serves three purposes:

  1. It introduces and describes my latest contribution to the Oracle Community,  the "XPLAN_ASH" tool

  • It accompanies a future OTN article on Parallel Execution that will be published some time in the future

  • It is supposed to act as a teaser for my upcoming "Parallel Execution Masterclass" that will be organized by Oracle University and can be booked later this year
  • Table Of Contents


    Real-Time SQL Monitoring Overview

    Real-Time SQL Monitoring Shortcomings

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