Performance tuning

rshamsud's picture

Nologging redo size

It is probably easy to calculate hourly redo rate or daily redo rate using AWR data. For example, my script awr_redo_size.sql can be used to calculate daily redo rate, and awr_redo_size_history.sql can be used to calculate hourly redo rate. Hourly redo rate is especially useful since you can export to an excel spreadsheet, graph it to see redo rate trend.

Update: I added another script to calculate redo rate if you don’t have AWR license. redo_size_archived_log.sql.

Introduction to Direct Mode Writes

rshamsud's picture

Video: deep review of LMS

This video was created circa July 2011. Click the Read More link to review the video. Version Oracle Database

Synopsis: Essentially, we probe the importance of LMS processes using DTrace. Explain why LMS should run in elevated priority. How to review deep statistics about LMS processes and much more.

rshamsud's picture

SCN – What, why, and how?

In this blog entry, we will explore the wonderful world of SCNs and how Oracle database uses SCN internally. We will also explore few new bugs and clarify few misconceptions about SCN itself.

What is SCN?

SCN (System Change Number) is a primary mechanism to maintain data consistency in Oracle database. SCN is used primarily in the following areas, of course, this is not a complete list:

rshamsud's picture

gc cr disk read

You might encounter RAC wait event ‘gc cr disk read’ in 11.2 while tuning your applications in RAC environment. Let’s probe this wait event to understand why a session would wait for this wait event.

Understanding the wait event

Let’s say that a foreground process running in node 1, is trying to access a block using a SELECT statement and that block is not in the local cache. To maintain the read consistency, foreground process will require the block consistent with the query SCN. Then the sequence of operation is(simplified):

rshamsud's picture

RMOUG 2012 – Hello Denver!

On February 14-16, I’ll be at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado for RMOUG’s Training Days Conference. This is the largest regional Oracle User Conference in North America and attracts presenters from all around the country and the globe. I’ll be presenting:

Presentation Name: Troubleshooting RAC Background Process

Abstract: RAC background process performance is critical to keep the application performance. This session will demo techniques to review the performance of RAC background processes such as LMS, LMD, LMON, etc. using various statistics and UNIX tools. The presentation will also discuss why certain background processes must run in higher priority to maintain the application performance in RAC.

Presentation Name: A Kind and Gentle Introduction to RAC

randolf.geist's picture

Extended DISPLAY_CURSOR With Rowsource Statistics


So this will be my Oracle related Christmas present for you: A prototype implementation that extends the DBMS_XPLAN.DISPLAY_CURSOR output making it hopefully more meaningful and easier to interpret. It is a simple standalone SQL*Plus script with the main functionality performed by a single SQL query. I've demoed this also during my recent "optimizer hacking sessions".

DBMS_XPLAN.DISPLAY_CURSOR together with the Rowsource Statistics feature (enabled via SQL_TRACE, GATHER_PLAN_STATISTICS hint, STATISTICS_LEVEL set to ALL or controlled via the corresponding hidden parameters "_rowsource_execution_statistics" and "_rowsource_statistics_sampfreq") allows since Oracle 10g a sophisticated analysis of the work performed by a single SQL statement.

rshamsud's picture

Troubleshooting ‘DFS lock handle’ waits

Waits for ‘DFS lock handle’ can cause massive performance issues in a busy RAC cluster. In this blog entry, we will explore the DFS lock handle wait event, and understand how to troubleshoot the root cause of these waits. I am also going to use locks and resources interchangeably in this blog, but internally, they are two different types of structures.

A little background

DFS (stands for Distributed File System) is an ancient name, associated with cluster file system operations, in a Lock manager supplied by vendors in Oracle Parallel Server Environment (prior name for RAC). But, this wait event has morphed and is now associated with waits irrelevant to database files also. Hence, it is imperative to understand the underlying details to debug the ‘DFS lock handle’ waits.

How does it work?

rshamsud's picture

Oracle Open World 2011 – My presentation on RAC topic

I will be talking about “Administering Parallel Execution in RAC” with demos on Sunday morning 9AM-10AM (session id 28060). This is part of IOUG RAC SIG presentation series. You would enjoy the content and demos I have prepared.

I know, it is too early, but hoping to see you there!
BTW, if you have attended my RAC Advanced Troubleshooting class series, please don’t hesitate to introduce yourself when we meet.

Session details:
Session ID: 28060
Session Title: IOUG: Administering Parallel Execution in Oracle RAC
Venue / Room: Moscone West- 2005
Date and Time: 10/2/11, 9:00 – 10:00

Update: I just completed this session in IOUG. Thank you for coming, if you were in the room.
You can download the pdf file from
PX execution in RAC

rshamsud's picture

RAC hack session – Tuesday – July 11 2011

I will be conducting a 1-hour deep dive session about RAC LMS process (and about LGWR processes too if time permits) using advanced UNIX utilities. Read Tanel’s blog entry for details:
RAC hack session

See you there!

rshamsud's picture

1-Day Expert Oracle-centric Conference at MIT – 07/07/11 -virtual or physical

You probably aware of 1 day event happening on July 7th Thursday 9AM-5PM EDT (virtually and physically). I will be talking about advanced UNIX tools to debug issues. You can find details of 1-day event here

Here is the outline of my presentation:

Advanced tools and techniques in Unix environment – Riyaj Shamsudeen – 07/07/2011, 3:15pm – 4:00pm EDT

Unix environments provides rich set of tools to debug performance issues. Even if the issue is complex to understand, if we use right tool for the job, we can identify the root cause of an issue quickly. In this presentation, the speaker will demo tools such as truss/strace, pfiles, pmap, prstat, vmstat, mpstat etc to show how you can debug complex issues. The speaker will also introduce Solaris/dtrace to understand performance issues.

Why not join us?

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