Performance tuning

oradebug's picture

New presentation: Deriving Optimal Configurations Using 11g Database Replay

Jeremiah Wilton’s presentation shows how to use Oracle 11g Real Application Testing to quantify effect of system and database configuration changes.  As an example, he uses Real Application Testing to validate the Automatic Advisor recommendations, and uncovers some interesting results.

Check out the presentation on our whitepaper page.

rshamsud's picture

Exciting seminars in Dallas arena

If you live in Dallas area, there are two very important seminars coming up:

  1. Tanel Poder is presenting his Advanced Oracle troubleshooting seminar on September 9-11, 2009. .
  2. Jonathan Lewis presenting two day seminar cost based optimization and writing efficient SQL on Oct 28 and Oct 29 2009
  3. .

These two gentlemen needs no introduction. Tanel Poder is an expert in Oracle internals and Jonathan Lewis is a Guru in Cost based optimization and writing efficient SQL.

Tell them I sent ya :-)

Update: I just heard from Tanel and he is unable to make it to Dallas this September. He is rescheduling his seminar and I can’t wait for his seminar. I will update this blog with his rescheduled dates.

rshamsud's picture

Shared pool freelists (and durations)

My earlier blog about shared pool duration got an offline response from one of my reader:
” So, you say that durations aka mini-heaps have been introduced from 10g onwards. I have been using Steve Adams’ script shared_pool_free_lists.sql. Is that not accurate anymore?”

Shared pool free lists

I have a great respect for Steve Adams . In many ways, he has been a great virtual mentor and his insights are so remarkable.

Coming back to the question, I have used Steve’s script before and it is applicable prior to Oracle version 9i. In 9i, sub-heaps were introduced. Further, shared pool durations were introduced in Oracle version 10g. So, his script may not be applicable from version 9i onwards. We will probe this further in this blog.

This is the problem with writing anything about internals stuff, they tend to change from version to version and In many cases, our work can become obsolete in future releases(including this blog!).

In version 9i, each sub-heap of the shared_pool has its own free list. In version 10g and 11g, each duration in sub-heap has its own free list. This is visible through x$ksmsp and column x$ksmsp.ksmchdur indicates the duration that chunk belongs to. In 9i, that column always has a value of 1 (at least, that I have experimented so far). In 10g & 11g (up to 11.1.0.7), there are exactly 4 durations in each sub-heap and values range from 1-4 for this column ksmchdur. Each duration has its own free list.

Shared_pool_free_list.sql script

rshamsud's picture

ORA-4031 and Shared Pool Duration

After reading my earlier post on shared pool A stroll through shared pool heap , one of my client contacted me with an interesting ORA-4031 issue. Client was getting ORA-4031 errors and shared pool size was over 4GB ( in a RAC environment). Client DBA queried v$sgastat to show that there is plenty of free memory in the shared pool. We researched the issue and it is worth blogging. Client DBA was confused as to how there can be ORA-4031 errors when the shared pool free memory is few GBs.

Heapdump Analysis

At this point, it is imperative to take heapdump in level 2 and Level 2 is for the shared pool heap dump. [ Please be warned that it is not advisable to take shared pool heap dumps excessively, as that itself can cause performance issue. During an offline conversation, Tanel Poder said that heapdump can freeze instance as his clients have experienced.]. This will create a trace file in user_dump_dest destination and that trace file is quite useful in analyzing the contents of shared pool heap. Tanel Poder has an excellent script heapdump_analyzer . I modified that script adding code for aggregation at hea, extent and type levels to debug this issue further and it is available as heapdump_dissect.ksh . ( with a special permission from Tanel to publish this script.)

Shared pool review

rshamsud's picture

RAC, parallel query and udpsnoop

I presented about various performance myths in my ‘battle of the nodes’ presentation. One of the myth was that how spawning parallel query slaves across multiple RAC instances can cause major bottleneck in the interconnect. In fact, that myth was direct result of a lessons learnt presentation from a client engagement. Client was suffering from performance issues with enormous global cache waits running in to 30+ms average response time for global cache CR traffic and crippling application performance. Essentially, their data warehouse queries were performing hundreds of parallel queries concurrently with slaves spawning across three node RAC instances.

Of course, I had to hide the client details and simplified using a test case to explain the myth. Looks like either a)my test case is bad or b) some sort of bug I encountered in 9.2.0.5 version c) I made a mistake in my analysis somewhere. Most likely it is the last one :-( . Greg Rahn questioned that example and this topic deserves more research to understand this little bit further. At this point, I don’t have 9.2.0.5 and database is in 10.2.0.4 and so we will test this in 10.2.0.4.

udpsnoop

UDP is one of the protocol used for cache fusion traffic in RAC and it is the Oracle recommended protocol. In this article, UDP traffic size must be measured. Measuring Global cache traffic using AWR reports was not precise. So, I decided to use a dtrace tool kit tool:udpsnoop.d to measure the traffic between RAC nodes. There are two RAC nodes in this setup. You can read more about udpsnoop.d. That tool udpsnoop.d can be downloaded from dtrace toolkit . Output of this script is of the form:

randolf.geist's picture

User objects created in the SYS schema and the (cost based) optimizer

The answer - as already disclosed by Nicolas Gasparotto - to the question that I asked here in the "Weekend Quiz" is to run the script as SYS user, and then run the query shown against these objects in the SYS schema (tested against 10g XE, 10.2.0.4 and 11.1.0.7 on Win32).

Note: It's not recommended to create any non-SYS objects in the SYS schema and you should only perform this (if at all) in a test database.

All this came up in this recent OTN forum thread where it became obvious that the issue can only be reproduced if the objects are owned by SYS.

There are two interesting points to derive from this (apart from the obvious that one should not create any user objects in the SYS schema):

1. The optimizer seems to treat objects owned by SYS differently, in particular regarding the transformations applied. Note that the crucial point is not that the query is executed as SYS user, but that the objects are owned by the SYS user. Granting appropriate privileges to a non-SYS user on the objects owned by SYS allows to reproduce the issue even with a non-SYS user.

2. It's something to remind if there is the need to understand a performance issue with a recursive dictionary query performed on SYS-owned objects. Although you obviously can't influence the SQL generated by Oracle itself it might help to understand the issue and take appropriate steps to rectify the issue.

Oh, by the way, have I already mentioned that it's really a bad idea to create user objects in the SYS schema?

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