performance

connor_mc_d's picture

Text indexes for numbers

We had an AskTOM question recently about being able to search for numbers within a concatenated list. The particular issue was a list of mobile phone numbers, but this is really just about tackling the larger issue of finding numbers within list.

Let’s create a simple example to see where things can break down (and how we can fix them).

fritshoogland's picture

Linux timing and scheduling granularity

During investigating how Oracle works with regards to waiting, I discovered an oddity. I was researching for my redo blog posts, and found that in a certain case, Oracle uses the ‘nanosleep’ system call. As the name of this system call suggests, this call allows you to let a process sleep with nanosecond precision.

The oddity that I found, was the following:

connor_mc_d's picture

Cool stuff with partition elimination

Sometimes in the IT world, the term “surprise” is not a good one.

“I woke up this morning and got a surprise…my database was down.”

“I ran a SELECT COUNT(*) on my most important table, and got a surprise result of zero rows.”

and so forth. Generally as IT professionals, encountering the unexpected is not a good start to the day Smile.

mwidlake's picture

Friday Philosophy – Explaining How Performance Tuning Is Not Magic?

Solving performance issues is not magic. Oh, I’m not saying it is always easy and I am not saying that you do not need both a lot of knowledge and also creativity. But it is not a dark art, at least not on Oracle systems where we have a wealth of tools and instrumentation to help us. But it can feel like that, especially when you lack experience of systematically solving performance issues.

fritshoogland's picture

A look into Oracle redo, part 6: oracle post-wait commit and the on disk SCN

This is the sixth part in a blog series about Oracle database redo. The previous posts provided information about the log writer writing, this post is about the process that is waiting after issuing commit for the log writer to write it’s redo from the public redo strand. When the database is using post/wait for process commits, the committing process follows the following (simplified) procedure:

fritshoogland's picture

A look into Oracle redo, part 5: the log writer writing

This the the fifth blog in a series of blogposts about Oracle database redo. The previous blog looked into the ‘null write’ (kcrfw_do_null_write actually) function inside kcrfw_redo_write_driver, which does housekeeping like updating SCNs and posting processes if needed, this blog looks into what happens when the log writer is actually posted by a process or if public redo strand buffers have been written into. In part 3 of this blog series (the log writer working cycle) it can be seen that when a session posts the log writer, it returns from the semaphore related functions, and calls ‘kcrfw_redo_write_driver’ directly, which otherwise is called inside ksbcti.

Inside the kcrfw_redo_write_driver function, the first thing of interest is executed only when the logwriter is posted, and the kcrfw_redo_write_driver function is called directly after returning from ksarcv and ksl_exit_main_loop_wait:

fritshoogland's picture

A look into into Oracle redo, part 4: the log writer null write

This is the fourth blogpost on a series of blogposts about how the Oracle database handles redo. The previous blogpost talked about the work cycle of the log writer: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/12/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-3-the-log-writer-work-cycle-overview/. This posts is looking into the execution of the kcrfw_redo_write_driver function executed in the ksbcti.

connor_mc_d's picture

NVL vs COALESCE

Jonathan Lewis just published a blog post about NVL and COALESCE and the optimizer costings for each.

There is also perhaps a significant difference between NVL and COALESCE in that the former seems to have an in-built optimization for handling bind variables and nulls. 

Consider an application where users optionally pass in search criteria and you have to query a table based on that criteria.  You have three natural choices here to implement that:

WHERE column = :search_criteria or :search_criteria is null

or

WHERE column = nvl(:search_criteria ,column)

or

WHERE column = coalesce(:search_criteria,column)

Functionally they are identical*, but the implementation detail shows a nice little optimizer trick that only works with NVL.

fritshoogland's picture

A look into Oracle redo, part 3: log writer work cycle overview

This is the third part of a series of blogposts on how the Oracle database handles redo. The previous part talked about the memory area that stores redo strand information: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/05/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-2-the-discovery-of-the-kcrfa-structure/.

The single most important process in the Oracle database for handling redo is the log writer, which primary task is flushing the redo information other Oracle database processes put in the public redo strands to disk. Now that we have investigated the public redo strands and concurrency (first part) and kcrfsg_ and the KCRFA structure (second part), it seems logical to me to look at the log writer.

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