rac

alexgorbachev's picture

Oracle Database Appliance — What Does It Mean for You and Your Business?

When I first heard about Oracle Database Appliance and what it does, I got really excited — I saw great potential in this product. When we got our hands dirty and started testing the appliance, I become confident that this product will be a hit. Now it’s finally the time when I can share my [...]

oraclebase's picture

11gR2 RAC on Windows 2008 using VirtualBox…

As I’ve mentioned before, I’ve kinda ignored the fact that any operating system other than Linux (specifically Oracle Linux) exists. It’s quite easy to do when you are working with Oracle products and you get to choose your own environment. :)

As a vague nod to the fact that Windows does actually exist, I’ve finally got round to updating my Windows virtual RAC article.

Windows 2008 is an unusual operating system in some respects. The RAC installation is pretty simple really, but finding some of the config dialogs is a complete nightmare. Chains of menus, dialogs, buttons and hyperlinks to get you to the dialog you need. What’s worse, some of the menus are hidden unless you remember to “Alt” or “Alt+N”. Crazy! If I was using Windows on a regular basis I think I would just memorize all the dialog program names and start them directly from the Run menu. It’s got to be easier than traversing that nightmare. I remember when Windows was considered the easy option. It doesn’t feel like the case anymore. :)

In related news, yesterday I got an invite from Jeremy Schneider to help out at RAC Attack at OOW 2011. That should be fun. See you there! :)

Cheers

Tim…




martin.bach's picture

A day at Cisco’s labs and an introduction to the UCS

I recently had the immense pleasure of visiting Cisco’s labs at Bedfont Lakes for a day of intensive information exchange about their UCS offering. To summarise the day: I was impressed. Even more so by the fact that there is more to come, I’m assuming a few more blogs posts about UCS will get published here after I had some time to benchmark it.

I knew about UCS from a presentation at the UKOUG user group, but it didn’t occur at the time which potential is behind the technology. This potential is something Cisco sadly fail to make clear on their website-which is very good once you understand the UCS concept as it gives you many details about the individual components.

I should stress that I am not paid or otherwise financially motivated to write this article, it’s pure interest in technology that made me write this blog post. A piece of good technology should be mentioned, and this is what I would like to do.

What is the UCS anyway?

When I mentioned to friends that I was going to see Cisco to have a look at their blade server offering I got strange looks. Indeed, Cisco hasn’t been known as a manufacturer of blades before, it’s only recently (in industry terms) that they entered the market. However instead of providing YABE (yet another blade enclosure), they engineered it quite nicely.

If you like, the UCS is an appliance-like environment you can use for all sorts of workloads. It can be fitted in a standard 42” Rack and currently consists of these components (brackets contain product designations for further reading):

  • Two (clustered) Fabric Interconnects (UCS 6120 or 6140 series) for 20 or 40 10G ports, with each port configurable as either uplinks into the core network or server links down to UCS chassis. These ports carry both Ethernet and FCoE traffic from the UCS chassis
  • Two Fabric Extenders (UCS 2100 series), which go into the blade enclosure and provide connectivity up to the Fabric Interconnects. Each UCS 2104 fabric extender (FEX) provides 40Gb bandwidth  to the Interconnect, controlled by QoS policies
  • Blade enclosures (UCS 5100 series), which contain 8 half-width or 4 full width blades
  • Different models of half-width and full-width UCS B-series blades providing up to 512G RAM and 7500 series Intel Xeon processors
  • 10GE Adapters which are Converged Network Adapters (CNA). In other words they can do Fibre Channel over Ethernet and non-storage Ethernet traffic

The Fabric Interconnects can take extension modules with Fibre Channel to link to a FC switch, there is no new technology introduced and existing arrays can be used. Also, existing fibre channel solutions can be used for backups.

Another of the interesting features is the management software, called UCS Manager. It’s integrated into the Fabric Interconnect using a few gigabyte of flash storage. Not only is it used to manage a huge number of blades, it can also stage firmware for each component. At a suitable time, the firmware can be upgraded in a rolling fashion except for the Fabric Interconnect (obviously), though the fabric interconnects can take advantage of the clustering functionality to ensure that complete firmware upgrades can be undertaken with a system-wide outage.

Fibre Channel over Ethernet

What I was very keen to learn about was the adoption of FCoE in UCS. Ever since it has been released, the UCS uses FCoE for storage inside the system. I can image that this must have been difficult to sell, since FCoE was a very young standard at the time, and still probably is.

For those of you who don’t know FCoE, it’s broadly speaking FC payloads in Ethernet frames. Since Ethernet was never designed to work like Fibre Channel, certain amendments had to be made to the 802.x standards. The so-modified Ethernet is often referred to as Data Centre Ethernet (DCE) or Converged Enhanced Ethernet (CEE). In a way, FCoE competes with established Fibre Channel and emerging ones such as iSCSI or even SRP for the future storage solution. History has shown that Ethernet is very resilient and versatile, it might well win the battle for unified connection-if implemented correctly. And by unified I mean network and storage traffic. I was told that the next generation UCS will not have dedicated Fibre Channel ports in the Fabric switches, all ports are unified. All you need is a small SFP to attach a fibre cable or 10G Ethernet.

The fabric Interconnects in the current version use traditional but aggregated 8G/s Fibre Channel to go to the storage.

Nice features

UCS introduces the idea of a service profile. This is probably the biggest differentiator between it and other blade solutions. A blade in the enclosure can take any role and configuration you assign to it. It took me a little while to understand this, but an analogy helped: think of a blade as something configurable similar to a VM: before you can put something on it, you first have to define it. Amongst the things you set are boot order (SAN boot is highly recommended, we’ll see why shortly), which VSAN to use, which VNICs to use in which VLAN etc. Instead of having to provide the same information over and over again, it’s possible to define pools and templates to draw this information from.

Technicalities set aside, once you define a service profile (let’s assume a RAC node for example), you assign this profile to a blade that’s in the enclosure. A few seconds later, you’ll see the blade boot from the storage array and you are done. If the SAN LUNs don’t contain a bootable operating system, you can us eth KVM to create one.

Another nice thing I think is the use of 10G Ethernet throughout. The two switches do not operate in Spanning Tree Mode, which would limit the uplink speed to 10G (one path)

There is obviously more, but I think this blog post has become longer than it should be. I might blog more about the system at a later stage, but not after going to add this final section:

Exadata?

The question that immediately springs to mind is: how does it compare to Exadata? Is it Exadata competition? Well, probably no. UCS is a blade system but it doesn’t feature Infiniband or zero copy/iDB protocol. It doesn’t come with its own more or less directly attached storage subsystem. It can’t do smart scans, create storage indexes, or do other cell offloading. It can’t do EHCC: all these are exclusive to Exadata.

This can be either good or bad for you, and the answer is of course “it depends”. If your workload is highly geared towards DSS and warehousing in general, and you have the requirement to go through TB of data quickly, then Exadata probably is the answer.

If you are in need of consolidating say your SPARC hardware on x86, a trend I see a lot, then you may not need Exadata, and in fact you might be better off waiting for Exadata to mature some more if you are really after it. UCS scores many points by not breaking completely with traditional data centre operations: you still use a storage array you connect the blades to. This makes provisioning of a test database as simple as cloning the production LUNs. Admittedly you get a lot of throughput from IPoIB as Exadata uses it, but I would doubt that an RMAN duplicate from active database is faster than creating clone on the storage array. UCS also allows you to use storage level replication such as SRDF of Continuous Access (or whichever name other vendor give it)

Summary

In summary, UCS is a well-engineered blade system using many interesting technologies. I am especially looking forward to FCoE multi-hop, which should be available with UCS 2. Imagine the I/O bandwidth you could get with all these aggregated links!

Disclaimer

Am I an expert on UCS? Nope, not by a long. So it could be that certain things described in this blog post might be inaccurate. If you like, use the comment option below to make me aware of these!

martin.bach's picture

Oracle RAC SIG presentation tips

Yesterday I proudly presented a one hour training class about upgrading to Oracle 11.2 RAC at oracleracsig.org. This was the first time I presented using this facility and thought it might be useful for others to learn about the procedures and hopefully encourage other speakers to follow suit. It’s really straight forward and there is nothing to worry about! Especially if you are already familiar with webex, presenting should be a piece of cake. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

So how do you get to present?

The Proposal

First of all, speak to the RAC SIG board, you should be able to get the email addresses from the website. You need to submit an abstract of your talk to the committee, and once they have decided to go ahead it’s all about scheduling. You should know that Oracle RAC SIG records your session, whilst Oracle University kindly provide the infrastructure in form of their Webex facility and conference calls.

The Technical Part

For those of you who don’t know webex, it’s a Cisco product which you can use to host web conferences on. It is very good for all sorts of screen sharing to a larger audience, and as a RAC SIG presenter you are effectively sharing your desktop with the participants. But image only doesn’t cut it, we need audio as well! Audio can either be part of the presentation stream via the webex-presentation, or you need to dial in to a toll-free number (available from http://www.intercall.com/national/oracleuniversity/gdnam.html). I have tested this both as a presenter and a participant, and it works really well. Just be sure to dial in 5-10 minutes early, as you will have to be connected to the correct meeting via an operator. This is especially true for the presenter.

Leading up to the Event

I suggest you contact Oracle RAC SIG 1-2 weeks prior to the event if your presentation has not yet appeared on the website. After all we would like some participants to listen to our talk! Remember that the website and everything is mainly run by volunteers so be patient and don’t expect a reply in 5 minutes.

When the time of the event approaches, roughly 3-5 days before it starts, you will get an email from the team informing you about the URL for the webex presentation, the dial-in code and some reminders for a successful session, which I’d like to repeat here:

  • Use a landline – not cell phone. Voice quality suffers too much on a mobile device
  • Don’t use a headset unless it is really, really good!  Use the handset. It might even be that the use of a cordless phone has a negative impact on the sound quality
  • Get on the webcast 15-20 minute s early to test connectivity and sound quality

Also ensure you send Oracle your slides to go to the website a few days before the scheduled event. At the time of writing, Dennis Karashima from Oracle was our liaison (again check the website for up to date information).

On the Day

If you are in the lucky situation that your employer actively endorses your presentation and it’s part of your work anyway, then it may be a good idea to use an office Internet connection and office phone (granted explicit permission from the company).

Otherwise, if you are not in the US, having a fast and reliable Internet connection upstream can really reduce latency. A good phone helps as well, and again, don’t use a cell phone, use a land line instead.

Roughly 30 minutes before the start of the webcast, join the webex as a participant, even if you are the presenter. The whole procedure is initiated from Oracle. Also ensure to dial in to your toll free number for the conference call. You are greeted by an operator, give him/her your passcode and they will put you through to the line where Oracle are already waiting. You are greeted by the very kind Dennis Karashima who is guiding you through the initial steps.  These include a connectivity test for the recording as well as some feedback about audio quality. In my case, I was advised to pause for 2-3 seconds after slide transitions or animations to allow the other participants to follow. Again, a better Internet connection can reduce the latency here.

Only at that stage are you told to share your desktop-don’t try this before you are prompted :) After the setup is complete, you will hear the advertisement from Oracle University, after which it’s your show to run.

Good luck!

If you are in a situation to open a Q & A session, announce this at the end of your presentation and liase with the operator to get questions.

That’s it-not scary at all, and really something more of us should do.

rshamsud's picture

RAC hack session – Tuesday – July 11 2011

I will be conducting a 1-hour deep dive session about RAC LMS process (and about LGWR processes too if time permits) using advanced UNIX utilities. Read Tanel’s blog entry for details:
RAC hack session

See you there!

martin.bach's picture

Using Connection Manager to protect a database

I have known about Oracle’s connection manager for quite a while but never managed to use it in anger. In short there was no need to do so. Now however I have been asked to help in finding a solution to an interesting problem.

In summary, my customer is running DR and UAT in the same data centre. Now for technical reasons they rely on RMAN to refresh UAT, no array mirror splits on the SAN (which would be way faster!) possible. The requirement is to prevent an RMAN session with target=UAT and auxiliary=DR from overwriting the DR databases, all of which are RAC databases on 11.2.The architecture included 2 separate networks for the DR hosts and the UAT hosts. DR was on 192.168.99.0/24 whereas UAT was on 192.168.100.0/24. A gateway host with two NICs connects the two. Initially there was a firewall on the gateway host to prevent traffic from UAT to DR, but because of the way Oracle connections work this proved impossible (the firewall was a simple set of IPTABLES rules). After initial discussions I decided to look at connection manager more closely as that is hailed as a solution to Oracle connectivity and firewalls.

Thinking more closely about the problem I realised that the firewall + static routes approach might not be the best one. So I decided to perform a test which didn’t involve IPTABLES or custom routes, and rely on CMAN only to protect the database. A UAT refresh isn’t something that’s going to happen very frequently, which allows me to shut down CMAN, and thus prevent any communication between the two networks. This is easier than maintaining a firewall-remember the easiest way to do something is not to do it at all.

Overview of Connection Manager

For those of you who aren’t familiar with CMAN, here’s a short summary (based on the official Oracle documentation).

Configuration of Oracle Connection Manager (CMAN) allows the clients to connect through a firewall [I haven’t verified this yet, ed]. CMAN is an executable that allows clients to connect despite a firewall being in place between the client and server. CMAN is similar to the Listener in that it reads a configuration file [called CMAN.ora, ed], which contains an address that Oracle Connection Manager listens for incoming connections. CMAN starts similar to the Listener and will enter a LISTEN state.

This solution [to the firewall issue with TCP redirects, ed] will make the REDIRECT happen inside the firewall and the client will not see it; CMAN comports as a proxy service between the client and the real database listener.

Interestingly, Connection Manager is fully integrated into the FAN/FCF framework and equally suitable for UCP connection pools.

Technically speaking Oracle database instances require the initialisation parameters local_listener and remote_listener to be set. In RAC databases, this is usually the case out of the box, however, in addition to the SCAN, the remote_listener must include the CMAN listener as well-an example is provided in this document.

Installing Connection Manager

Connection Manager is now part of the Oracle client, and you can install it by choosing the “custom” option. From the list of selectable options, pick “Oracle Net Listener” and “Oracle Connection Manager”.

From there on it’s exactly the same as any other client installation.

Testing

A quick test with 2 separate networks reveals that the concept actually works. The following hosts are used:

  • cman                     192.168.99.224
  • cmandb                192.168.100.225
  • client                     192.168.99.31

The networks in use are:

  • Public network:  192.168.99.0/24
  • Private network: 192.168.100.0/24

As you can see CMANDB is on a different network than the other hosts.

Connection manager has been installed on host “cman”, with IP 192.168.99.224. The listener process has been configured to listen on port 1821. The corresponding cman.ora file has been configured as follows in $CLIENT_HOME/network/admin:

cman1 =
(configuration=
(address=(protocol=tcp)(host=192.168.99.224)(port=1821))
(rule_list=
(rule=(src=*)(dst=127.0.0.1)(srv=cmon)(act=accept))
(rule=(src=192.168.99.0/24)(dst=192.168.100.225)(srv=*)(act=accept))
)
)

The file has been left in this minimalistic state deliberately. The only connection possible is to the database host. The cmon service must be allowed or otherwise the startup of the connection manager processes will fail.

The gateway host has 2 network interfaces, one for each network:

[root@cman ~]# ifconfig
eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:16:3E:F2:34:56
inet addr:192.168.99.224  Bcast:192.168.99.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
RX packets:1209 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:854 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:105895 (103.4 KiB)  TX bytes:147462 (144.0 KiB)
Interrupt:17

eth1      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:16:3E:52:4A:56
inet addr:192.168.100.224  Bcast:192.168.100.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
RX packets:334 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:151 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:36425 (35.5 KiB)  TX bytes:22141 (21.6 KiB)
Interrupt:16

Its routing table is defined as follows:

[root@cman ~]# route -n
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
192.168.100.0   0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     0      0        0 eth1
192.168.101.0   0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     0      0        0 eth2
192.168.99.0    0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     0      0        0 eth0
169.254.0.0     0.0.0.0         255.255.0.0     U     0      0        0 eth2
[root@cman ~]

Configuration on host “CMANDB”

Note that host 192.168.100.225 is on the private network! The database CMANDB has its local and remote listener configured using the below entries in tnsnames.ora:

[oracle@cmandb admin]$ cat tnsnames.ora

[oracle@cmandb admin]$ cat tnsnames.ora
LOCAL_CMANDB =
(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS_LIST =
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(PORT = 1521)(HOST = 192.168.100.225))
)
)

REMOTE_CMANDB =
(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS_LIST =
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(PORT = 1821)(HOST = 192.168.99.224))
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(PORT = 1521)(HOST = 192.168.100.225))
)
)

CMAN_LSNR =
(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS_LIST =
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(PORT = 1521)(HOST = 192.168.99.224))
)
)
  • local listener is set to local_cmandb
  • remote listener is set to remote_cmandb
  • CMAN_LSNR is used for a test to verify that a connection to the CMAN listener is possible from this host

The host had only one network interface, connecting to the CMAN host:

[root@cmandb ~]# ifconfig
eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:16:3E:12:14:51
inet addr:192.168.100.225  Bcast:192.168.100.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
RX packets:627422 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:456584 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:2241758430 (2.0 GiB)  TX bytes:32751153 (31.2 MiB)

The only change to the system was the addition of a default gateway. Unfortunately the CMAN process cannot listen on more than one IP address:

# route add default gw 192.168.100.224 eth0

The following routing table was in use during the testing:

[root@cmandb ~]# route -n
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
192.168.100.0   0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     0      0        0 eth0
169.254.0.0     0.0.0.0         255.255.0.0     U     0      0        0 eth0
0.0.0.0         192.168.100.224 0.0.0.0         UG    0      0        0 eth0

After the database listener parameters have been changed to LOCAL_CMANDB and REMOTE_CMANDB, the alert log on the CMAN host recorded a number of service registrations. This is important as it allows Connection Manager to hand the connection request off to the database:

[oracle@cman trace]$ grep cmandb *
08-JUL-2011 10:19:55 * service_register * cmandb * 0
08-JUL-2011 10:25:28 * service_update * cmandb * 0
08-JUL-2011 10:35:28 * service_update * cmandb * 0
[...]
08-JUL-2011 11:15:10 * service_update * cmandb * 0
08-JUL-2011 11:15:28 * service_update * cmandb * 0
[oracle@cman trace]$

Additionally, the CMAN processes now know about the database service CMANDB:

CMCTL:cman1> show services
Services Summary...
Proxy service "cmgw" has 1 instance(s).
Instance "cman", status READY, has 2 handler(s) for this service...
Handler(s):
"cmgw001" established:0 refused:0 current:0 max:256 state:ready

(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=127.0.0.1)(PORT=23589))
"cmgw000" established:0 refused:0 current:0 max:256 state:ready

(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=127.0.0.1)(PORT=31911))
Service "cmandb" has 1 instance(s).
Instance "cmandb", status READY, has 1 handler(s) for this service...
Handler(s):
"DEDICATED" established:0 refused:0 state:ready
REMOTE SERVER
(DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(PORT=1521)(HOST=192.168.100.225)))
Service "cmandbXDB" has 1 instance(s).
Instance "cmandb", status READY, has 1 handler(s) for this service...
Handler(s):
"D000" established:0 refused:0 current:0 max:1022 state:ready
DISPATCHER 
(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=cmandb.localdomain)(PORT=50347))
Service "cmon" has 1 instance(s).
Instance "cman", status READY, has 1 handler(s) for this service...
Handler(s):
"cmon" established:1 refused:0 current:1 max:4 state:ready

(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=127.0.0.1)(PORT=59541))
The command completed successfully.
CMCTL:cman1>

Connectivity Test

With the setup completed it was time to perform a test from a third host on the (public) network. Its IP address is 192.168.99.31. The below TNSnames entries were created:

[oracle@client admin]$ cat tnsnames.ora
CMAN =
(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS_LIST =
(ADDRESS = (PORT=1821)(HOST=192.168.99.224)(PROTOCOL=TCP))
)
(CONNECT_DATA =
(SERVICE_NAME = cmandb)
(SERVER = DEDICATED)
)
)

DIRECT =
(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS_LIST =
(ADDRESS = (PORT=1521)(HOST=192.168.100.225)(PROTOCOL=TCP))
)
(CONNECT_DATA =
(SERVICE_NAME = cmandb)
(SERVER = DEDICATED)
)
)

The CMAN entry uses the Connection Manager gateway host to connect to database CMANDB, whereas the DIRECT entry tries to bypass the latter. A tnsping should show whether or not this is possible.

[oracle@client admin]$ tnsping direct
TNS Ping Utility for Linux: Version 11.2.0.1.0 - Production on 08-JUL-2011 11:19:47

Copyright (c) 1997, 2009, Oracle.  All rights reserved.

Used parameter files:

Used TNSNAMES adapter to resolve the alias

Attempting to contact (DESCRIPTION = (ADDRESS_LIST = (ADDRESS = (PORT=1521)(HOST=192.168.100.225)(PROTOCOL=TCP))) (CONNECT_DATA = (SERVICE_NAME = cmandb) (SERVER = DEDICATED)))

TNS-12543: TNS:destination host unreachable

[oracle@client admin]$ tnsping cman

TNS Ping Utility for Linux: Version 11.2.0.1.0 - Production on 08-JUL-2011 10:53:27

Copyright (c) 1997, 2009, Oracle.  All rights reserved.

Used parameter files:

Used TNSNAMES adapter to resolve the alias

Attempting to contact (DESCRIPTION = (ADDRESS_LIST = (ADDRESS = (PORT=1821)(HOST=192.168.99.224)(PROTOCOL=TCP))) (CONNECT_DATA = (SERVICE_NAME = cmandb) (SERVER = DEDICATED)))

OK (0 msec)

[oracle@client admin]$

Now that proves that a direct connection is impossible, and also that the connection manager’s listener is working. A tnsping doesn’t imply that a connection is possible though, this requires an end to end test with SQL*Plus:

[oracle@client admin]$ sqlplus system/xxx@cman

SQL*Plus: Release 11.2.0.1.0 Production on Fri Jul 8 10:55:39 2011

Copyright (c) 1982, 2009, Oracle.  All rights reserved.

Connected to:
Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.2.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Data Mining and Real Application Testing options

SQL> select instance_name,host_name from v$instance;

INSTANCE_NAME
----------------
HOST_NAME
----------------------------------------------------------------
cmandb
cmandb.localdomain

The successful connection is also recorded in the CMAN log file:

Fri Jul 08 10:55:39 2011

08-JUL-2011 10:55:39 * (CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=cmandb)(SERVER=DEDICATED)(CID=(PROGRAM=sqlplus@client)(HOST=client)(USER=oracle))) * (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=192.168.99.31)(PORT=16794)) * establish * cmandb * 0

(LOG_RECORD=(TIMESTAMP=08-JUL-2011 10:55:39)(EVENT=Ready)(CONN NO=0))

tanelpoder's picture

RAC hack!

In other words – FREE STUFF!!!

Riyaj Shamsudeen does a free RAC hacking session on 12 July!

He will demonstrate how the LMS background process works, with the help of OS tracing tools like truss and DTrace.

Sign up here!

 

Update:

A video recording of the session can be found here: http://www.vimeo.com/26798681

 

 

rshamsud's picture

Advanced RAC Training

I will be delivering an intense, advanced 2-week RAC training seminar in Aug 22-26 and Sep 19-23 with numerous demos, dumps and scripts. We will meet 4 hours per day, in a virtual world, 8AM-12 Noon Pacific time for those two weeks. Tanel has written has a great blog post about this seminar series Advanced RAC training.

If you like my presentations about RAC and performance tuning, you will love my seminar series. You will gain better understanding about RAC internals, and you will be able to advance your debugging and performance tuning skills attending my seminar series.

Join me and Let’s explore RAC further.

tanelpoder's picture

Advanced RAC Training by Oracle RAC expert Riyaj Shamsudeen

If you’ve troubleshooted (or tuned) RAC then you probably already know Riyaj Shamsudeen and his Orainternals blog & website (links below).

Anyway, since I started delivering my Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting classes some years ago, many people asked whether I would do a similar class for RAC. I had deliberately left out the RAC-specific stuff from my troubleshooting material, because it’s a very wide and complex topic and I feel like before trying to master RAC troubleshooting, you should master troubleshooting of regular single instance databases anyway. I realized that I didn’t have the time to build (and maintain) yet another set of trainig material, especially on so complex topic as RAC performance & troubleshooting. 

So, having seen Riyaj’s impressive work and his presentations at various conferences, I asked whether he would be interested in building a RAC troubleshooting class, going from fundamentals to advanced topics – and he said yes. By now we are that far that I’m happy to announce the first Advanced RAC online seminars by Riyaj Shamsudeen (split across two weeks of online sessions, 4-hours per day, in end of august and september).

We initially called the seminar “Advanced RAC Troubleshooting” but then realized, that there are some closely related non-troubleshooting topics to be covered, like fundamental concepts, internals and also how to configure RAC for performance (so that you wouldn’t have to troubleshoot performance later :-)

We’ll use the same infrastructure and seminar philosophy as I do in my own online seminars, it’s just that this is Riyaj’s material and he will deliver it too.

You can read more about the seminar content, dates and sign up at the seminars page:

Seminars:

Riyaj’s blog:

Riyaj’s website (articles, slides etc):

 

Let the RAC hacking begin! ;-)

 

rshamsud's picture

Presenting in IOUG Webinar: RAC Performance tuning – Private inter connect

I will be presenting in IOUG Webinar on Thursday June 30, 2011 11AM-12Noon CDT. Hope you can join me.
Register at Private interconnect .
I know, I have not been blogging more actively, but I have been working on books and few presentations lately. Hopefully, you will see more blog entries soon.
Thanks for reading my blog.

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