SQL Server

tim.evdbt@gmail.com's picture

SQL Saturday – 25-March 2017 – Colorado Springs CO

I’m really excited about speaking at SQL Saturday on my favorite topic!

SQLSaturday is a free training event for Microsoft Data Platform professionals and those wanting to learn about SQL Server, Business Intelligence and Analytics.  I’m all for that!

At this event, I’ll be discussing Accelerating DevOps and TDM Using Data Virtualization.  This is my favorite topic, because for the 20 years that I worked as a DBA, I ran into the same roadblock time and again.  The roadblock of data volume.

“DevOps” is a conflation of parts of the words “development” and “operations”, and it represents the grass-roots movement to merge application development, application testing, and IT operations into one continuous stream.  All tasks from coding to testing to operations must be automated so that new features and fixes can be delivered on a continual flow.

JonathanGennick's picture

Make a Difference!

My twelfth and final in a series of posts in response to Tim Ford's #EntryLevel Challenge.


The lowest points in my career have been when I've lacked focus and follow-through. The best have been when I was energized by clear vision and committed myself toward scary goals. A good example is my first-ever book project that I committed to in 1996. 

JonathanGennick's picture

Make a Difference!

Don't waste your career sitting on the fence. Commit to something! Work
diligently. Make a difference. 



Read the full post at www.gennick.com/database.

JonathanGennick's picture

Accelerating Your Experience

Eleventh in a series of posts in response to Tim Ford's #EntryLevel Challenge.


We all want more experience. The fastest way to get it is by helping solve other people's problems. I'm talking here of online forums and similar venues in which you can grow in skill by taking your current knowledge and applying it to scenarios others are struggling in. Because those others will present with far more problems in a shorter period of time than you could ever cause or encounter on your own. 

Here's a snippet from a recent email I received offering some paid work:

"We would like to have someone whom we can contact who can assist us on occasion with Squarespace and are wondering how much you would charge for occasional help?"

Nice! Isn't it? 

Here's another, asking my help on a project:

JonathanGennick's picture

Accelerating Your Experience

We all want more experience. The fastest way to get it is by helping solve
other people's problems.



Read the full post at www.gennick.com/database.

JonathanGennick's picture

Accelerating Your Experience

Eleventh in a series of posts in response to Tim Ford's #EntryLevel Challenge.


We all want more experience. The fastest way to get it is by helping solve other people's problems. I'm talking here of online forums and similar venues in which you can grow in skill by taking your current knowledge and applying it to scenarios others are struggling in. Because those others will present with far more problems in a shorter period of time than you could ever cause or encounter on your own. 

Here's a snippet from a recent email I received offering some paid work:

"We would like to have someone whom we can contact who can assist us on occasion with Squarespace and are wondering how much you would charge for occasional help?"

Nice! Isn't it? 

Here's another, asking my help on a project:

JonathanGennick's picture

The Roots of Relational

Tenth in a series of posts in response to Tim Ford's #EntryLevel Challenge.

Special guest this month: Chris Date

JonathanGennick's picture

The Roots of Relational

A conversation with Chris Date about the term relational, and how that term
came to be used to describe database engines such as SQL Server and Oracle
Database.



Read the full post at www.gennick.com/database.

JonathanGennick's picture

The Roots of Relational

Tenth in a series of posts in response to Tim Ford's #EntryLevel Challenge.

Special guest this month: Chris Date

JonathanGennick's picture

Subqueries

Ninth in a series of posts in response to Tim Ford's #EntryLevel Challenge.


Subqueries are queries within a query – one SELECT nested within another. They can take the place of column and table references, helping you to formulate queries that otherwise would be more difficult or less efficient to express using join operations. 

As Columns

Following is an example of a subquery filling a position typically occupied by a column name or expression. The goal of the query is to list the number of products per subcategory.

SELECT ps.name,
    (SELECT COUNT(*)
    FROM Production.Product p
    WHERE p.ProductSubcategoryID = ps.ProductSubcategoryID) AS sub_count
FROM production.ProductSubcategory ps

The output looks as  follows:

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