Technical

jeremy.schneider's picture

OSP #3a: Build a Standard Cluster Platform

This is the fifth article in a series called Operationally Scalable Practices. The first article gives an introduction and the second article contains a general overview. In short, this series suggests a comprehensive and cogent blueprint to best position organizations and DBAs for growth.

We’ve looked in some depth at the process of defining a standard platform with an eye toward Oracle database use cases. Before moving on, it would be worthwhile to briefly touch on clustering.

jeremy.schneider's picture

OSP #3a: Build a Standard Cluster Platform

This is the fifth article in a series called Operationally Scalable Practices. The first article gives an introduction and the second article contains a general overview. In short, this series suggests a comprehensive and cogent blueprint to best position organizations and DBAs for growth.

We’ve looked in some depth at the process of defining a standard platform with an eye toward Oracle database use cases. Before moving on, it would be worthwhile to briefly touch on clustering.

jeremy.schneider's picture

OSP #3a: Build a Standard Cluster Platform

This is the fifth article in a series called Operationally Scalable Practices. The first article gives an introduction and the second article contains a general overview. In short, this series suggests a comprehensive and cogent blueprint to best position organizations and DBAs for growth.

We’ve looked in some depth at the process of defining a standard platform with an eye toward Oracle database use cases. Before moving on, it would be worthwhile to briefly touch on clustering.

jeremy.schneider's picture

Chicago Oracle User Community Restart

Chicago is the third largest city in the United States. There are probably more professional Oracle users here than most other areas in the country – and yet for many years now there hasn’t been a cohesive user group.

But right now there’s an opportunity for change. If the professional community of Chicago Oracle users steps up to the plate.

jeremy.schneider's picture

Chicago Oracle User Community Restart

Chicago is the third largest city in the United States. There are probably more professional Oracle users here than most other areas in the country – and yet for many years now there hasn’t been a cohesive user group.

But right now there’s an opportunity for change. If the professional community of Chicago Oracle users steps up to the plate.

jeremy.schneider's picture

Chicago Oracle User Community Restart

Chicago is the third largest city in the United States. There are probably more professional Oracle users here than most other areas in the country – and yet for many years now there hasn’t been a cohesive user group.

But right now there’s an opportunity for change. If the professional community of Chicago Oracle users steps up to the plate.

jeremy.schneider's picture

Command Line Attachment to Oracle Support Service Request

For those who haven’t looked at this in awhile: these days, it’s dirt simple to attach a file to your SR directly from the server command line.

curl –T /path/to/attachment.tgz 
     –u "your.oracle.support.login@domain.com" 
     "https://transport.oracle.com/upload/issue/0-0000000000/"

Or to use a proxy server,

curl –T /path/to/attachment.tgz
     –u "your.oracle.support.login@domain.com"
     "https://transport.oracle.com/upload/issue/0-0000000000/"
     -px proxyserver:port
     -U proxyuser

There is lots of info on MOS (really old people call it metalink); doc 1547088.2 is a good place to start. There are some other ways to do this too. But really you can skip all that, you just need the single line above!

jeremy.schneider's picture

Command Line Attachment to Oracle Support Service Request

For those who haven’t looked at this in awhile: these days, it’s dirt simple to attach a file to your SR directly from the server command line.

curl –T /path/to/attachment.tgz 
     –u "your.oracle.support.login@domain.com" 
     "https://transport.oracle.com/upload/issue/0-0000000000/"

Or to use a proxy server,

curl –T /path/to/attachment.tgz
     –u "your.oracle.support.login@domain.com"
     "https://transport.oracle.com/upload/issue/0-0000000000/"
     -px proxyserver:port
     -U proxyuser

There is lots of info on MOS (really old people call it metalink); doc 1547088.2 is a good place to start. There are some other ways to do this too. But really you can skip all that, you just need the single line above!

jeremy.schneider's picture

Command Line Attachment to Oracle Support Service Request

For those who haven’t looked at this in awhile: these days, it’s dirt simple to attach a file to your SR directly from the server command line.

curl –T /path/to/attachment.tgz 
     –u "your.oracle.support.login@domain.com" 
     "https://transport.oracle.com/upload/issue/0-0000000000/"

Or to use a proxy server,

curl –T /path/to/attachment.tgz
     –u "your.oracle.support.login@domain.com"
     "https://transport.oracle.com/upload/issue/0-0000000000/"
     -px proxyserver:port
     -U proxyuser

There is lots of info on MOS (really old people call it metalink); doc 1547088.2 is a good place to start. There are some other ways to do this too. But really you can skip all that, you just need the single line above!

jeremy.schneider's picture

OEM CLI Commands for Bulk Property Changes

This will be a brief post, mostly so I can save this command somewhere besides the bash_history file on my OEM server. It may prove useful to a few others too… it has been absolutely essential for me on several occasions! (I was just using it again recently which reminded me to stick it in this blog post.) This is how you can make bulk property changes to a large group of targets in OEM:

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