Technical

jeremy.schneider's picture

Command Line Attachment to Oracle Support Service Request

For those who haven’t looked at this in awhile: these days, it’s dirt simple to attach a file to your SR directly from the server command line.

curl –T /path/to/attachment.tgz 
     –u "your.oracle.support.login@domain.com" 
     "https://transport.oracle.com/upload/issue/0-0000000000/"

Or to use a proxy server,

curl –T /path/to/attachment.tgz
     –u "your.oracle.support.login@domain.com"
     "https://transport.oracle.com/upload/issue/0-0000000000/"
     -px proxyserver:port
     -U proxyuser

There is lots of info on MOS (really old people call it metalink); doc 1547088.2 is a good place to start. There are some other ways to do this too. But really you can skip all that, you just need the single line above!

jeremy.schneider's picture

Command Line Attachment to Oracle Support Service Request

For those who haven’t looked at this in awhile: these days, it’s dirt simple to attach a file to your SR directly from the server command line.

curl –T /path/to/attachment.tgz 
     –u "your.oracle.support.login@domain.com" 
     "https://transport.oracle.com/upload/issue/0-0000000000/"

Or to use a proxy server,

curl –T /path/to/attachment.tgz
     –u "your.oracle.support.login@domain.com"
     "https://transport.oracle.com/upload/issue/0-0000000000/"
     -px proxyserver:port
     -U proxyuser

There is lots of info on MOS (really old people call it metalink); doc 1547088.2 is a good place to start. There are some other ways to do this too. But really you can skip all that, you just need the single line above!

jeremy.schneider's picture

OEM CLI Commands for Bulk Property Changes

This will be a brief post, mostly so I can save this command somewhere besides the bash_history file on my OEM server. It may prove useful to a few others too… it has been absolutely essential for me on several occasions! (I was just using it again recently which reminded me to stick it in this blog post.) This is how you can make bulk property changes to a large group of targets in OEM:

jeremy.schneider's picture

OEM CLI Commands for Bulk Property Changes

This will be a brief post, mostly so I can save this command somewhere besides the bash_history file on my OEM server. It may prove useful to a few others too… it has been absolutely essential for me on several occasions! (I was just using it again recently which reminded me to stick it in this blog post.) This is how you can make bulk property changes to a large group of targets in OEM:

jeremy.schneider's picture

OEM CLI Commands for Bulk Property Changes

This will be a brief post, mostly so I can save this command somewhere besides the bash_history file on my OEM server. It may prove useful to a few others too… it has been absolutely essential for me on several occasions! (I was just using it again recently which reminded me to stick it in this blog post.) This is how you can make bulk property changes to a large group of targets in OEM:

jeremy.schneider's picture

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

jeremy.schneider's picture

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

jeremy.schneider's picture

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

jeremy.schneider's picture

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

jeremy.schneider's picture

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

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