Troubleshooting

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Error Logging

Error logging is a topic that I’ve mentioned a couple of times in the past, most recently as a follow-up in a discussion of the choices for copying a large volume of data from one table to another, but originally in an addendum about a little surprise you may get when you use extended strings (max_string_size = EXTENDED).

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Masterclass – 1

A recent thread on the Oracle developer community database forum raised a fairly typical question with a little twist. The basic question is “why is this (very simple) query slow on one system when it’s much faster on another?” The little twist was that the original posting told use that “Streams Replication” was in place to replicate the data between the two systems.

Franck Pachot's picture

strace the current Oracle session process

Here is my way to trace system calls from the current session process.
This must not be done in production.
An strace.log file will be generated with system calls

connect / as sysdba
column spid new_value pid
select spid from v$process join v$session on v$session.paddr=v$process.addr where sid=sys_context('userenv','sid');
column spid clear
define bg=&:
host strace -fy -p &pid -o strace.log &bg
select * from v$osstat;
disconnect

Originally posted on Twitter, but improved here

https://twitter.com/FranckPachot/status/969898128030695424

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Cardinality Puzzle

One of the difficulties of being a DBA and being required to solve performance problems is that you probably never have enough time to think about how you got to a solution and why the solution works; and if you don’t learn about the process itself , you just don’t get better at it. That’s why I try (at least some of the time) to write articles and books (as I did with CBO Fundamentals) that

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Cursor_sharing force

Prompted by a recent ODC (OTN) question I’ve just written up an example of one case where setting the cursor_sharing parameter to force doesn’t work as you might expect. It’s a specific example of what I believe is a theme that can appear in several different circumstances: if your SQL mixes “genuine” bind variable with literals then the literals may not be substituted.

Here’s a simple data set to start with:

jeremy.schneider's picture

This Week in PostgreSQL – May 31

Since last October I’ve been periodically writing up summaries of interesting content I see on the internet related to PostgreSQL (generally blog posts). My original motivation was just to learn more about PostgreSQL – but I’ve started sharing them with a few colleagues and received positive feedback.  Thought I’d try posting one of these digests here on the Ardent blog – who knows, maybe a few old readers will find it interesting? Here’s the update that I put together last week – let me know what you think!


Hello from California!

Part of my team is here in Palo Alto and I’m visiting for a few days this week. You know… for all the remote work I’ve done over the years, I still really value this in-person, face-to-face time. These little trips from Seattle to other locations where my teammates physically sit are important to me.

jeremy.schneider's picture

This Week in PostgreSQL – May 31

Since last October I’ve been periodically writing up summaries of interesting content I see on the internet related to PostgreSQL (generally blog posts). My original motivation was just to learn more about PostgreSQL – but I’ve started sharing them with a few colleagues and received positive feedback.  Thought I’d try posting one of these digests here on the Ardent blog – who knows, maybe a few old readers will find it interesting? Here’s the update that I put together last week – let me know what you think!


Hello from California!

Part of my team is here in Palo Alto and I’m visiting for a few days this week. You know… for all the remote work I’ve done over the years, I still really value this in-person, face-to-face time. These little trips from Seattle to other locations where my teammates physically sit are important to me.

jeremy.schneider's picture

This Week in PostgreSQL – May 31

Since last October I’ve been periodically writing up summaries of interesting content I see on the internet related to PostgreSQL (generally blog posts). My original motivation was just to learn more about PostgreSQL – but I’ve started sharing them with a few colleagues and received positive feedback.  Thought I’d try posting one of these digests here on the Ardent blog – who knows, maybe a few old readers will find it interesting? Here’s the update that I put together last week – let me know what you think!


Hello from California!

Part of my team is here in Palo Alto and I’m visiting for a few days this week. You know… for all the remote work I’ve done over the years, I still really value this in-person, face-to-face time. These little trips from Seattle to other locations where my teammates physically sit are important to me.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

SQL Monitor

I’ve mentioned the SQL Monitor report from time to time as a very useful way of reviewing execution plans – the feature is automatically enabled by parallel execution and by queries that are expected to take more than a few seconds to complete, and the inherent overheads of monitoring are less than the impact of enabling the rowsource execution statistics that allow you to use the ‘allstats’ format of dbms_xplan.display_cursor() to get detailed execution information for a query. The drawback to the SQL Monitor feature is that it doesn’t report predicate information.

Uwe Hesse's picture

How to cancel SQL statements in #Oracle 18c

https://uhesse.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/helps.png?w=600&h=558 600w, https://uhesse.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/

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