Troubleshooting

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Table Scans

It’s amazing how easy it is to interpret a number incorrectly until the point comes where you have to look at it closely – and then you realise that there was a lot more to the number than your initial casual assumption, and you would have realised it all along if you’d ever needed to think about it before.

Here’s a little case in point. I have a simple (i.e. non-partitioned) heap table t1 which is basically a clone of the view dba_segments, and I’ve just connected to Oracle through an SQL*Plus session then run a couple of SQL statements. The following is a continuous log of my activity:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Add primary key.

I thought I had written this note a few years ago, on OTN or Oracle-L if not on my blog, but I can’t find any sign of it so I’ve decided it’s time to write it (again) – starting as a question about the following code:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Trace file size

Here’s a convenient enhancement for tracing that came up on Twitter a few days ago – first in a tweet that I retweeted, then in a question from Christian Antognini based on this bit of the 12c Oracle documentation (opens in separate tab). The question was – does it work for you ?

The new description for max_dump_file_size says that for large enough values Oracle will split the file into multiple chunks of a few megabytes, using a suffix to identify the sequence of the chunks, keeping only the first chunk and the most recent chunks. Unfortunately this doesn’t seem to be true. However, prompted by Chris’ question I ran a quick query against the full parameter list looking for parameters with the word “trace” in their name:

randolf.geist's picture

DML Operations On Partitioned Tables Can Restart On Invalidation

It's probably not that well known that Oracle can actually rollback / re-start the execution of a DML statement should the cursor become invalidated. By rollback / re-start I mean that Oracle actually performs a statement level rollback (so any modification already performed by that statement until that point gets rolled back), performs another optimization phase of the statement on re-start (due to the invalidation) and begins the execution of the statement from scratch.

randolf.geist's picture

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A new version 4.22 of the XPLAN_ASH utility is available for download.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

This version primarily addresses an issue with 12c - if the HIST mode got used to pull ASH information from AWR in 12c it turned out that Oracle forgot to add the new "DELTA_READ_MEM_BYTES" columns to DBA_HIST_ACTIVE_SESS_HISTORY - although it got officially added to V$ACTIVE_SESSION_HISTORY in 12c. So now I had to implement several additional if/then/else constructs to the script to handle this inconsistency. It's the first time that the HIST view doesn't seem to reflect all columns from the V$ view - very likely an oversight rather than by design I assume.

oakroot's picture

[Oracle] Understanding the Oracle code instrumentation (wait interface) - A deep dive into what is really measured

Introduction

This blog post is inspired by a question from an attendee of Sigrid Keydana's DOAG 2015 conference session called "Raising the fetchsize, good or bad? Exploring memory management in Oracle JDBC 12c". Basically it was a question about what the wait event "SQL*Net more data to client" represents and what it really measures. In general you may use the following steps, if you don't know what a particular wait event means:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Trouble-shooting

This is the text of the “whitepaper” I submitted to DOAG for my presentation on “Core Strategies for Troubleshooting”.

Introduction

In an ideal world, everyone who had to handle performance problems would have access to ASH and the AWR through a graphic interface – but even with these tools you still have to pick the right approach, recognise the correct targets, and acquire information at the boundary that tells you why you have a performance problem and the ways in which you should be addressing it.

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Nul points

(To understand the title, see this Wikipedia entry)

The title could also be: “Do as I say, don’t do as I do”, because I want to remind you of an error that I regularly commit in my demonstrations. Here’s an example:

 
SQL> create table t (n number); 

Table created 

Have you spotted the error yet ? Perhaps this will help:

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Forget-me-nots

Here’s a little note that I drafted (according to its date stamp) in January 2013 and then forgot to post. (Which adds a little irony to the title.)

============================================================

Here’s an object lesson in (a) looking at what’s in front of you, and (b) how hard it is to remember all the details.

I ran a script today [ED: i.e. some time early Jan 2013] that I’ve have no problems with in earlier versions of Oracle, but today I was running it against 11.2.0.3 for the first time, and hit a problem with autotrace:

oakroot's picture

[Oracle] Insights into SQL hints - Embedded global and local hints and how to use them

Introduction

The idea for this blog post started a few weeks ago when i had to troubleshoot some Oracle database / SQL performance issues at client site. The SQL itself included several views and so placing hints (for testing purpose) into the views was not possible, especially as the views were used widely and not only by the SQL with the performance issue. In consequence this blog post is about the difference between embedded global and local hints and how to use them.

 

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