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connor_mc_d's picture

18c database creation on Windows

Hopefully you’ve followed my very simple and easy guide to downloading the 18c database software for Windows. But of course, software on its own is not much use – we need a database! So let’s get cracking and create one. Using the Start menu like I’ve done below, or using the Windows panels, locate the Database Configuration assistant and start it.

image

 

After a few seconds the initial screen will ask what you want to do.  Choose “Create Database”.

connor_mc_d's picture

18c Database installation on Windows

If you’re a Windows enterprise, or you want to run your 18c database on your Windows laptop/desktop for research and education, then there has been some good news this week.  The software is now available to you on the OTN network page.  Here’s a walk through of the software installation process

Head to the standard database downloads page

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/enterprise-edition/downloads/index.html

Accept the license agreement and choose the Windows version to download

connor_mc_d's picture

Take care with regular expressions

In an Office Hours session a couple of months back, I covered an important change that comes to regular expressions once you upgrade to 12c Release 2. You can see the video covering the issue here:

but for the TL;DR brigade reading this post: Regular expressions are not deterministic when you take NLS settings into account and thus cannot be used in constraints and/or function-based indexes.

This is just a post to quickly revisit the topic for anyone thinking of upgrading from an earlier release to 12c Release 2. An AskTOM question came in asking what would happen to such constraints during the upgrade process.

connor_mc_d's picture

Gooey GUIDs

Do a quick Google search and you’ll find plenty of blog posts about why GUIDs are superior to integers for a unique identifier, and of course, an equal number of posts about why integers are superior to GUIDs. In the Oracle world, most people have been using sequence numbers since they were pretty much the only option available to us in earlier versions. But developers coming from other platforms often prefer GUIDs simply due to their familiarity with them.

khailey's picture

MySQL 5.6 vs 5.7

Whitelist preview of Performance Insights has just started on RDS MySQL and it gave me a chance to visually compare load profiles of MySQL 5.6 and 5.7.

I first tried to use sysbench and ran into some curious anomolies.

The test I ran was

sysbench \
           --test=oltp \
           --oltp-table-size=10000000 \
           --oltp-test-mode=complex \
           --num-threads=10 \
           --max-time=0 \
           --max-requests=0 \
           --mysql-host=$host \
           --mysql-user=$user \
           --mysql-password=$password \
           --mysql-db=sysbench run

Load chart on MySQL 5.6 and 5.7

 

MySQL 5.6

I first ran on MySQL 5.6 and in Performance Insights the load looked like:

connor_mc_d's picture

Let’s talk about Techiquette

I’m typing this at about 38,000 feet in the air. I’m travelling home from the Oracle Latin America tour – it was a great event, but I’ll save the details for another blog post. In reality, I should be sleeping, but as luck would have it one of the lights on our plane is malfunctioning. So whilst the rest of the plane is sleeping happily in restful darkness, my row and the rows around it are bathed in blazing artificial light Sad smile

image

Ah…the joys of travel. Anyway, I digress.

connor_mc_d's picture

Building community via the speaker community

I recently participated in the Oracle Developer Community Yatra tour throughout India. It is a hectic event with 7 cities covered in a mere 9 days, so you can imagine how frantic the pace was. A typical day would be:

  • 7am – breakfast
  • 8am – check out of hotel and leave for the venue
  • 9am – speak all day, host Q&A
  • 6pm – leave straight from venue to the airport
  • 8pm – dinner at airport, and fly to next city
  • 1am – get to next hotel, grab some sleep before doing it all again in 6 hours time

Yet as a speaker in this event, it never felt that the logistics of the event were out of control.  This is mainly due to the incredible work of the people in the AIOUG (All India Oracle User Group) coordinated by Sai Penumuru. The smoothness of the organization prompted me to blog about how user groups could follow the AIOUG lead in terms of running successful events.

connor_mc_d's picture

Humble pie made with NULL strings

I was helping out a client a while back with an issue where a panicked email came into my inbox along the lines of “SELECT IS BROKEN IN ORACLE!!!”, which seemed perhaps a little extreme Smile. So I pursued it further asking for some concrete details, and I must concede it had me a little bamboozled for a while. I’ve simplified the example to keep it easy to digest, but the premise is the same.

My colleague had a table with a couple of VARCHAR2 columns:

image

connor_mc_d's picture

Hyper-partitioned index avoidance thingamajig

As you can tell, I have no idea on a name for what I am about to describe. So let me start from the beginning, and set the scene for an idea I have to utilize a cool new 18c feature.

Often in a transactional-style system the busiest table (let us call it SALES for the sake of this discussion) is also

  • the biggest table, after all, it has all of our sales in it,
  • the most demanded for table, in that, almost every query in our application wants to access it in some way shape or form.

This is in effect the database version of the Pareto Principle. Everyone wants a slice of that SALES “pie”, and the piece of that pie that is in most demand is typically the most recent data. Your application may have pages that will be showing:

connor_mc_d's picture

18.3 As easy as 1…2…3

Well, finally it’s here! 18c for on-premise installation so the world can all get stuck into the cool new features of the latest release on their own laptops Smile  At least that is what I’ll be doing!

Naturally as soon as I heard the news, I downloaded the software and got ready to set aside the day for installation and creation of an 18c database. But I didn’t need that long – I didn’t need that long at all. Just a few clicks and a few commands and there it was – my 18c database up and running.

Check out how easy it is with my three videos.

Software Installation

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