Uncategorized

connor_mc_d's picture

UTL_FILE_DIR and 18c

I wrote a blog post called The Death of UTL_FILE which attracted a comment from a reader:

“There is NO chance to stay at UTL_FILE as it is DESUPPORTED starting with database Version 18c”

This is not the case, but since I wanted to clarify what has changed in 18c, it warrants this small but separate blog post. When UTL_FILE first into existence in Oracle 7, the concept of directory object did not apply to UTL_FILE. Clearly we could not just let UTL_FILE to write to any destination, otherwise a malicious person could write a little PL/SQL block like this:

connor_mc_d's picture

More triggers are better

Yes, you heard me correctly. If you have got one trigger on a table, then you might be surprised to find that perhaps having a second one will be a better option. Then again, I also love the sweet scent of a clickbaity, inflammatory blog post title to draw the readers in Smile so you’ll just have to read on to see which is true.

connor_mc_d's picture

DDL for constraints – subtle things

The DBMS_METADATA package is very cool. I remember the days of either hand-crafting DDL statements based on queries to the data dictionary, or many a DBA will be familiar with running “imp show=y” or “imp indexfile=…” in order to then laboriously extract the DDL required from the import log file.  DBMS_METADATA removed all of those annoyances to give us a simple API to get the true and complete DDL for a database object.

But when extracting DDL from the database using the DBMS_METADATA package, you need to be aware of some subtleties especially if you plan on executing that DDL in the database.

connor_mc_d's picture

The death of UTL_FILE

In a previous post I covered a technique to improve the performance of UTL_FILE, but concluded the post with a teaser: “you probably don’t need to use UTL_FILE ever again”.

image

Time for me to back that statement up with some concrete evidence.

UTL_FILE can read and write files. This blog post will cover the writing functionality of UTL_FILE and why I think you probably don’t need UTL_FILE for this. I’ll come back to UTL_FILE to read files in a future post.

connor_mc_d's picture

When WHEN went faster

Yeah…try saying that blog post title 10 times in a row as fast as you can Smile

But since we’re talking about doing things fast, this is just a quick post about a conversation I had a twitter yesterday about the WHEN clause in a trigger.

 

image

That is an easy benchmark to whip up – I just need a couple of tables, each with a simple a trigger differing only by their usage of the WHEN clause.  Here is my setup:

connor_mc_d's picture

Juicing up UTL_FILE

Think about your rubbish bin for a second. Because, clearly this is going to be an oh so obvious metaphor leading into UTL_FILE right?  OK, maybe a little explanation is needed. I have a basket next to my desk into which I throw any waste paper. It is where I throw my stupid ideas and broken dreams Smile

connor_mc_d's picture

The simplest things….can be risky

Java and Oracle expert Lukas Eder tweeted yesterday about a potential optimization that could be done when reviewing database SQL code.

image

mwidlake's picture

OUG Scotland – Why to Come & Survival Guide

The UKOUG’s Scottish conference is on the 21st June in the centre of Edinburgh, at the Sheraton Grand Hotel, not far from Edinburgh Castle in the centre of the city.

mauro.pagano's picture

Introducing SQLdb360: merging eDB360 and SQLd360, while raising the bar for community engagement

Today, we are very happy to release SQLdb360, a new tool that merges together eDB360 and SQLd360, under a single package

Tools eDB360 and SQLd360 can still be used independently, but now there is only one package to download and keep updated. All the new features and updates to both tools are now in that one package.

The biggest change that comes with SQLdb360 is the kind invitation to everyone interested to contribute to its development. This is why the new blended name and its release format.

connor_mc_d's picture

The AskTOM data model

I popped out a tweet yesterday in Throwback Thursday style showing the date of the first question we took AskTOM – 18 years ago! Many entire computer systems don’t even last that long, and AskTOM hasn’t really needed to change that much in those 18 years.

To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.
Syndicate content