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connor_mc_d's picture

Seasons greetings from the AskTOM team

This year we’ve answered over 2800 of your questions and followed up on 3500 reviews. It’s been a great and busy year! We’ll see you all in 2018

connor_mc_d's picture

iASH–my “infinite ASH” routine

I love Active Session History (ASH) data because a lot of the work I’ve done in my consulting life was “after the fact” diagnosis.  By this I mean that many of us have been in a similar circumstance where the customer will contact you not when a problem is occurring, but only when you contact them for some other potentially unrelated reason.  At which point you hear will that dreaded sentence:

“Yeah, the Order Entry screen was really slow a couple of hours ago

And this is where ASH is an awesome resource.  With the ASH data available, there is a good chance you will be able to diagnose the issue without having to make an embarrassing request for the customer to repeat the task so that you can trace the underlying database activity.  Because no-one likes to be the person that says:

“Yeah that performance must have really sucked for you … Hey, let’s do it again!”

Jonathan Lewis's picture

Tech 2017 Agenda

As usual it’s hard to pick a personal agenda from the wealth of content available for the UKOUG annual conference, but this is my starting list:

Sunday

13:40 – 14:25 Roger MacNicol: “My query plan says Table Access Full: what happens next ?”

14:40 – 15:30 Gert Poel: “Smart Database Development with PL/SQL and Oracle REST Data Services”

16:10 – 17:00 Kellyn Pot’Vin: “Oracle vs. SQL Server – the War of the Indexes”

17:10 – 18:00 Luiza Koziel: “How to improve your presentations AK the Tool is Just a Tool… Learn how to use it for a Good Cause”

Monday

9:00 – 9:50  ME! I launch (one stream of) the conference with “Index Statistics and Column Groups”

11:35 – 13:25 Ivica Arsov: “Parallel Execution with Oracle 12c” … there may be some overlap with my 2nd presentation

connor_mc_d's picture

LOBs from afar

This has always been a nuisance.  There you are – getting all the bells and whistles with LOBs…until a database link enters the room Smile

connor_mc_d's picture

So good … it’s scary

Well…this isn’t a horror movie, it’s something awesome

martin.bach's picture

Little things worth knowing: scheduler jobs and Instance Caging

While updating material for a training class about Database Resource Management I briefly wondered if Instance Caging should apply for scheduler jobs as well. The obvious answer is “yes”, but I wanted to find proof. I hope I did in the end, and wanted to share how I got there.

The test environment

My system is based on the shiny new AMD Ryzen 7 1700X Eight-Core Processor, and it shows as 1s8c16t. I really like it! My 12.2.0.1 database named DEMO is patched to August 2017 – 12.2.0.1.170814 to be precise. It’s difficult to test resource management, and specifically Instance Caging, with a dual-core laptop, so this machine should help!

Test setup

Apart from the database workload I am soon going to launch the system is otherwise idle. I set cpu_count to 4 and made sure I had a resource manager plan active:

connor_mc_d's picture

Buffer cache hit ratio–blast from the past

I was perusing some old content during a hard drive “spring clean” the other day, and I found an old gem from way back in 2001.  A time when the database community were trying to dispel the myth that all database performance issues could be tracked back to,  and solved via, the database buffer cache hit ratio.  Thankfully, much of that folklore has now passed into the realm of fiction, but I remember at the time, as a means of showing how silly some of the claims were, I published a routine that would generate any buffer cache hit ratio you desired.  It just simply ran a query to burn through logical I/O’s (and burn a whole in your CPU!) until the required number of operations bumped up the buffer cache hit ratio to whatever number you liked Smile 

connor_mc_d's picture

UKOUG is coming

Yes it is just a few more weeks until the UKOUG conference swings by.

This has been one of my favourite conferences for years – dating back to my first one in 2002 !!.  You can see from the picture at the tail of this post – whilst times have changed in those 15 years, the basic tenets of community, networking and technical content remain unchanged to this day.

The AskTOM team will all be there and there’s a fantastic agenda spread over 4 days.  This user group really knows how to “bake” a good conference.  Maybe they followed my recipe. Smile

 

khailey's picture

IP CIDR rules and address ranges

I always forget IP address range coverage rules and forget where to look.

It’s the wiki!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classless_Inter-Domain_Routing

and for good reference here is the table:

/32 is for a single address

/24 is for a range in the last place x.x.x.0

/16 is for a range in the last 2 places x.x.0.0

Screen Shot 2017-11-03 at 11.28.31 AM

connor_mc_d's picture

Parsing freeform data in flat files

SQL loader is a very cool utility that has existed for a long time within Oracle to load flat files into the database. However sometimes people find the control file syntax quite cryptic, and when it comes to passing very complicated structures, this can mean control files which are hard to maintain. For me the best solution here is to use an external table. That way we can combine the power of the SQL Loader control file syntax embedded within the external table definition, along with the full power of PL/SQL and SQL for additional parsing of that data.

Here is an example where the data is spread across multiple lines and the task is to bring all that data together into a natural form, namely an ID followed by text.

So here is my file that has free format text

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